Foods4BetterHealth Reports on the Benefits of the 100-Mile Diet

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Foods4BetterHealth.com, a new food and nutrition web site that believes that healthy eating is the key to living a long and healthy life, is reporting on a new book called The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating, which emphasizes the benefits of eating local food.

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Foods4BetterHealth Reports on the Benefits of the 100-Mile Diet

Could You Live Off the 100-Mile Diet?

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Foods4BetterHealth.com, a new food and nutrition web site that believes that healthy eating is the key to living a long and healthy life, is reporting on a new book called The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating, which emphasizes the benefits of eating local food.

As Foods4BetterHealth notes (http://www.foods4betterhealth.com/could-you-live-off-the-100-mile-diet-4189), the 100-mile diet has gained momentum in the past few years, with many people now purporting the benefits of eating local food, such as that from local farmers’ markets. The authors of the new book embarked on a one-year journey, during which they only ate food made from within a 100-mile radius. On average, food bought from a supermarket has traveled between 1,500–3,000 miles from the farm to a person’s plate. (Source: Smith, A., et al., The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating, New York: Random House Canada, 2007, 3.)

As the Foods4BetterHealth article “Could You Live Off the 100-Mile Diet?” notes, there are many benefits of eating local food. First of all, food made near a person’s home is going to be fresher than food bought at a grocery store that has already traveled thousands of miles before they see it. Since locally grown food hasn’t spent time sitting and wasting away in a warehouse, the nutrient content is also likely to be higher than supermarket-bought food; for example, it’s estimated that leafy vegetables lose 50% to 89% of their vitamin C between 24 and 48 hours after harvest. (Source: “The Benefits of Eating Locally,” Get Local web site; http://www.getlocalbc.org/.)

The Foods4BetterHealth report also observes that another one of the benefits of eating local food is that a person has an increased connection to their food, since they will be able to actually be in touch with the people who make and grow it. When a person buys local food, they can also be assured that their money stays local and will be used to directly support their community. (Source: Tancock, K., “Interview: The 100-Mile Diet,” Canadian Living web site; http://www.canadianliving.com/life/green_living/interview_the_100_mile_diet.php.)

The Foods4BetterHealth report concludes that the benefit of eating local food, and of the 100-mile diet, is that the consumer also reduces their ecological footprint, since buying locally ensures that the food is not traveling for miles, which is more environmentally sustainable. (Source: Gabriel, C., “Ten Reasons to Eat Local,” HANS: Health Action Network Society web site, summer 2007; http://www.hans.org/magazine/331/Ten-Reasons-to-Eat-Local.html.)

Foods4BetterHealth.com, created by Doctors Health Press, is a food news and health web site, offering readers information about the latest food controversies, exclusive expert advice, and health tips to ward off illness, prevent disease, and live a long, healthy life. For more information, visit http://www.foods4betterhealth.com.

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Adrian Newman
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