Firstborns May Make Better Salespeople

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A childÂ?s upbringing has a strong influence on their ability to be a successful salesperson, among other things. A nationally renowned psychologist says he knows why.

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Firstborns May Make Better Salespeople

Studies Reveal Sales Secrets May Lie in Parenting of Firstborn children

Santa Ana, California (PRWEB) September 29, 2003 – A child’s upbringing has a strong influence on their ability to be a successful salesperson, among other things. A nationally renowned psychologist says he knows why.

According to Thomas K. Connellan, PhD., firstborns, in general, tend to be stronger salespeople than children born after a sibling. Connellan claims that the key can be found in the different way firstborns are treated.

“Firstborns are held to different standards,” says Connellan. “These standards continue to influence a person’s behavior throughout their life. Smart companies need to think about that when hiring.”

Connellan claims he’s not telling companies to hire only firstborns, but to pay attention to the way firstborns are parented, and use this information to guide their own management style.

“Parents of firstborns do three things differently,” Connellan says, “they insist on accountability, they have higher expectations, and they give feedback. Companies that can manage similarly will improve employee performance.”

According to the research from his latest book, Bringing Out the Best in Others! 3 Keys for Business Leaders, Educators, Coaches, and Parents (Bard Press, Feb. 2003), changing just three management techniques can produce changes in sixty to ninety days.

Sales managers, Connellan found, that expect accountability, believe in their employees, and provide liberal feedback, will almost certainly see improved performance.

“You don’t have to hire firstborns,” Connellan adds, “you would simply do well to treat your employees like them.”

Connellan is former Program Director and Research Associate on the University of Michigan Business School faculty and an advisor to Dell, Marriott, the Air Force Academy, GE, Sony, and Neiman Marcus.

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