Alternative burial in Israel: Breathtaking not only for the dead, but also for the living

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With all traditional Jewish heritage, death customs, and laws, Rest in Peace in Israel funeral services attracts Jewish people from all over the world, including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform & non religious to be buried in Â?heaven on earthÂ?.

The cemeteries in Israel are crowded and somewhat neglected. More and more people prefer to be buried in a secular burial. A solution to this problem may be found in the Kibbutzim, part of which offer burial lots in beautiful well nursed cemeteries, with an offer of a personal secular funeral.

The site is breath taking, not only for the dead but also for the living: on a small hill, beyond the cowshed, the chicken house and the celebration garden, there the secular Kibbutz cemetery is to be found. The smell of flowers in the air, plowed fields all around, everything clean, nursed and green.

The graves are spaced, with convenient pavements in between, designed with a veriety of gravestones, according to the request of the families that thier dears have been buried there. Gravestones of special stone, different types of inscrptions carved in, and plenty of vegetation, trees and flower planters. Is this the sight in Heaven?

To bring a close person to rest in peace is never an experience to be taken lightly. But the burial in a Kibbutz can take off some of the burden. Jewish people from Israel and abroad decide to buy a burial lot in a Kibbutz while living or after death. In return to the payment, they receive from the Kibbutz people the sense of warmth, of home and of genuine concern at hard times.

All the arrangements concerning the transportation of the deceased to the Kibbutz cemetery and conduction of a respectable ceremony are perfectly organized:

At the destined hour an ambulance leaves the parking lot of the Kibbutz towards the cemetary, followed by the honoring crowd, a walk of a few meters (yards). After the coffin has been lowered and covered, the ceremony begins. The funeral is conducted at choise. You may bring a rabbi, play music or sing together. The Kibbutz supplies all the requiered facilities, for example:

A large cold water container with cups, amplifiing system or chairs.

But not only the ceermony and the scenery tempt the many to decide to bury their dead in a Kibbutz – also the option to postpone and plan the burial to a more convenient day if, for instance, a rainy day is expected, or a relative has not arrived yet, from out of the country. To many, the possibility of visiting the tomb at any time, including Saturdays and summer evenings, is the point of decision. There is always a gardener working and caring, always a person in charge which may be reached by phone, always a will to comply wth the family’s requests. Our dear ones, which at life had cared for thier small home garden, rest now in such a beautiful place, surrounded by greenary, trees and flowers, and it does good to all.

It is not to difficult to understand the success of the secular burial in the Kibbutzim. The majority of burial grounds in Israel are not well kept, difficult for orientation, lack proper signposting, and some even lack pavements. In addition, many prefer preclude a religios orthodox burial and to conduct alternative ceremonies. The Kibbutzim give a solution and offer burial lots by payment to people from out of the Kibbutz, i.e. people which are not Kibbutz members or their first degree relatives, who wish to find eternal peace to themselves or their dear ones, under the shade of the Kibbutz trees.

For additional information on the permission and form application to transfer bodies to Israel visit: http://www.israel.org/mfh/go.asp?MFHH037b0

For additional information on the burial in a Kibbutz please visit: http://www.rip-il.com

Contact:

Rest in Peace in Israel

Kibbutz Beit Zera

15135, D.N. Jordan Valley Israel.

Tel: +972-54-846-916

Fax: +1-240-208-8125

info@rip-il.com

http://www.rip-il.com

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Omri Brill