MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE AT 100: Exhibition Celebrates Centennial Anniversary of Pioneering Photojournalist's Birth

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"MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE AT 100 is a major retrospective exhibition celebrating the centennial anniversary of the pioneering photojournalistÂ?s birth. The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, April 2, from 5 to 7. The exhibition continues through June 27. A gallery talk by renowned Bourke-White author and associate Sean Callahan will be held on May 14 at 6 PM.

MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE AT 100: EXHIBITION CELEBRATES CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY OF PIONEERING PHOTOJOURNALIST’S BIRTH

Santa Fe Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce “MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE AT 100”, a major retrospective exhibition celebrating the centennial anniversary of the pioneering photojournalist’s birth. The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, April 2, from 5 to 7. The exhibition continues through June 27. A gallery talk by renowned Bourke-White author and associate Sean Callahan will be held on May 14 at 6 PM.

Featured in the exhibition are rare and historically significant photographs from every aspect of Bourke-White’s career, including assignments in the Southwest and New Mexico. Also included are numerous vintage photographs – the actual prints used for LIFE magazine stories, with important archive information inscribed and stamped on the backside of each photograph

Margaret Bourke-White was born on June 14, 1904, in New York City, and graduated from Cornell University in 1927. Choosing photography as a profession, she immediately began her dramatic career by experimenting with industrial subjects. By 1929, Bourke-White’s reputation attracted the attention of the publisher Henry Luce, who engaged her as an associate editor for his FORTUNE magazine. Throughout the next several years, there was no location or type of photography too difficult or too mundane for Bourke-White. She covered assignments throughout the United States, and traveled to Germany and Russia. In what would be just one of many “firsts," Bourke-White became the first foreign photographer allowed to take pictures of Russian industry.

Between 1930 and 1936, Bourke-White would return to Russia twice more and become the first foreign cinematographer to leave the country with motion pictures of its industry. In 1934 she photographed the Dust Bowl, and in 1935 began aviation photography for TWA and Eastern Airlines. In 1936, Bourke-White joined Peter Stackpole, Tom McAvoy, and Alfred Eisenstaedt as the first staff photographers for LIFE magazine. Her photograph of the great Fort Peck dam appeared on the first issue’s cover.

Bourke-White went on to cover the world, traveling to Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Rumania, Turkey, Syria, Egypt, China, and again to the Soviet Union. She was the only U.S. photographer present in Moscow as the Germans attacked Russia in 1941. Bourke-White became the first woman accredited as a war correspondent in 1942, and became the first woman to accompany an Air Force bombing mission (1943).

In 1944, Bourke-White covered World-War II from Italy, eventually joining Patton’s army as it traveled through Germany in 1945. Among Bourke-White’s most haunting and memorable work are the pictures taken at Buchenwald.

Assignments for LIFE took Bourke-White throughout India, Japan, Korea, and South Africa. She photographed Mahatma Gandhi many times, taking her last picture of him hours before he was assassinated.

Bourke-White authored several books, including Portrait of Myself, You Have Seen Their Faces, Shooting The Russian War, Purple Heart Valley, and Halfway To Freedom. There are numerous books written about her life and work as well as a 1960 made-for-television movie.

Margaret Bourke White was one of the most famous and most successful photographers of her time. Her combination of intelligence, talent, ambition, and flexibility made her an ideal contributor to the new journalism that developed during the thirties. She was a woman, doing a man's job, in a man's world, from the foundries of Cleveland to the battlefields in World War II. Bourke-White fought a heroic 20-year battle with Parkinson’s disease prior to her death in 1971.

She was named as one of the 100 most influential women of twentieth century.

Monroe Gallery of Photography was founded by Sidney S. Monroe and Michelle A. Monroe. Building on more than four decades of collective experience, the gallery specializes in classic black & white photography with an emphasis on humanist and photojournalist imagery. The gallery also represents a select group of contemporary and emerging photographers.

Gallery hours are 10 to 6 Monday through Saturday, 10 to 5 Sunday. Admission is free. For further information, or to schedule an interview with Sean Callahan, please call: 505.992.0800; E-mail: info@monroegallery.com. Media kit with images available upon request.

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