Businesses Use Older PC's to Boost Productivity & Save Money

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Small business owners can reduce their employee time tracking expenses and add a shared calendar, all by turning an otherwise obsolete PC into a time clock appliance.

Small business owners can reduce their employee time tracking expenses and add a shared calendar, all by turning an otherwise obsolete PC into a time clock appliance.

The service, offered by software developer Five Sticks (Oak Park, Illinois), is simple. Businesses drop off or send in their old computer. Five Sticks converts that old PC into appliance by installing Linux and their free FstxTime software package. The company then ships the system back to the customer.

Once converted to a time clock appliance, the computer can be reattached to the business’s existing computer network. Users then punch in and out using any standard Internet browser. All updates and software backup are handled automatically, there’s no limit to the number of system users, and the appliance can even be configured to be accessible via the public Internet.

All of the software is provided under standard Open Source licenses, free of charge. The conversion service costs $199, significantly less than most manual time clocks found at office supply stores.

“This is how we help customers,” said Reid Carlberg, president of Five Sticks. “We concentrate on increasing their productivity while saving them money.”

According to Carlberg, the conversion of an old PC into a time clock appliance allows customers to take advantage of powerful Open Source software solutions without having to invest the time learning the software itself.

“We work with these technologies—Linux, Java, MySQL—every day,” he said, “So we can get everything working together quickly and easily. The end user never has to worry about what’s running the computer. They only have to take advantage of the fact that it works.”

Call 888-627-8888 or visit http://www.fivesticks.com for more information.

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Reid Carlberg