Why People Low-Carb - The Mood Behind the Food

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A low-carb revolution is underway, and as many as two-thirds of American adults -- about 163 million -- are now counting carbs. In the most comprehensive review of its kind, LowCarb Energy magazine recently asked 1541 people their main reasons for low-carbing.

A low-carb revolution is underway, and as many as two-thirds of American adults -- about 163 million -- are now counting carbs. But what motivates consumers to embark on a low-carb lifestyle, which means virtually eliminating traditional foods such as bread, pasta, potatoes and sweets?

In the most comprehensive review of its kind, LowCarb Energy magazine recently asked 1541 adults their main reasons for low-carbing. While weight loss was the most frequently cited goal (79 percent of respondents), nearly 75 percent said there was more than one incentive to watch their carbohydrate intake. Better health was the driving force for 26 percent, while just over 23 percent sought to improve overall eating habits. Twenty percent wanted to maintain their weight, and 16 percent said they're low-carbing to gain energy.

"Even though many people lose weight by low-carbing, it's much more than a 'diet,'" says LowCarb Energy Editor-in-Chief Vanessa Sands. "As far as experienced, successful low-carbers are concerned, the word 'diet' implies something temporary. Instead, they refer to low-carbing as a lifestyle or 'way of eating'" -- and, Sands says, therein lies its success.

"Our readers constantly tell me how low-carbing helps them with everything from weight loss to managing certain medical conditions. What's so significant, though, is that they love living this way. They can eat delicious food, never have to feel hungry, and say they feel great." At a time when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting that 64 percent of Americans are overweight, Sands says, "Those three factors make a huge difference in helping people stick with whichever plan they choose."

Diabetes, insulin resistance and PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) were among health conditions that respondents said low-carbing helped them control. The number one write-in response was that the low-carb lifestyle helps people "feel better," as declared by nearly four percent of those who responded.

And although survey participants' waistlines are getting smaller -- making low-rise pants, cropped shirts or even bikinis once again fashion options for many -- only one-third of one percent said they were watching carbs primarily to improve their appearance.

"Low- and controlled-carb approaches are changing the way people think about food, because they get results and don't feel deprived," says Sands. "Especially when it comes to losing weight, what more can you ask?"

ABOUT LOWCARB ENERGY

More than 220,000 copies of LowCarb Energy magazine's debut issue will be available nationwide in bookstores, mass market retailers, drugstores and health food stores beginning May 4. The first issue of this 128-page print publication from Coincide Publishing, LLC, offers more than 50 recipes for breakfasts, barbeques, summer picnics, cocktails and even desserts. Drawing on advice from health professionals, fitness gurus, researchers, nutritionists, chefs and other experts, readers will find articles on everything from low-carbing while traveling to smart exercise routines to a tropically themed low-carb menu to enjoy while watching "Pirates of the Caribbean." Find out more online at http://www.LowCarbEnergy.com.

ABOUT THE SURVEY

Results were derived from 1541 responses on LowCarb Energy magazine subscription signups and an online survey during the first four months of 2004. Totals equal more than 100 percent due to rounding and the option to choose more than one response.

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CONTACT: Nancy Price, Vice President of Marketing

Coincide Publishing, LLC

Email: feedback@coincide.com

Phone: (920) 687-8614

http://CoincidePublishing.com
http://LowCarbEnergy.com

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