UAW Union Leadership Elect Florida Writer to Chair TOP Advisory Board [Seth Eisenberg Will Chair UAW Region 8 TOP Board]

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Seth Eisenberg, a Florida freelance writer and community activist, has been elected chairman of the Technical, Office and Professional Advisory Board (TOP) of the International Union, UAW for the 12-state region that stretches from Pennsylvania to Florida. With more than one million active and retired members, the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) is one of the largest and most diverse labor organizations in America.

Seth Eisenberg, a Florida freelance writer and community activist, has been elected chairman of the Technical, Office and Professional Advisory Board (TOP) of the International Union, UAW for the 12-state region that stretches from Pennsylvania to Florida. With more than one million active and retired members, the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) is one of the largest and most diverse labor organizations in America. Eisenberg, 42, of Weston, Fla., was elected at the union’s recent regional leadership conference in Daytona Beach.

During his three-year term, Eisenberg will advise the UAW International Executive Board on matters concerning technical, office and professional employee policies, help establish an information clearinghouse, and review efforts to bring increased job security and benefits to the region’s workers through union membership.

Also elected were Teresa Martin, vice-chair, and Gerald Saunders, recording secretary.

Eisenberg, president of Eisenberg Communications and executive director of the 411-KIDS volunteer program, is also Florida coordinator for the National Writers Union. NWU represents nearly 5,000 journalists, authors and business/technical writers. In 1992, the group affiliated with United Auto Workers, becoming UAW Local 1981.

Eisenberg said watching four years of continuous assaults on workers’ rights, safety and security by corporate and special interests motivated his decision to seek elected office.

“Without collective support, resources and bargaining abilities, workers rarely have the power to demand the safety, security and rights they deserve,” Eisenberg said. “Workers lives should not be a variable expense heartlessly manipulated to meet quarterly financial targets,” he added.

“Over the last four years,” Eisenberg said, “America’s workers have faced unprecedented challenges to hard earned benefits and rights. Government policies have undermined the safety and security of workers on the job while supporting the outsourcing of American jobs with callous disregard for the impact on American workers, our families and our communities.”

“How come American jobs are being outsourced at the fastest pace in history but when it comes to fighting in Iraq, the far majority of soldiers being wounded and killed are Americans? Why can’t the White House outsource those jobs?” Eisenberg questioned.

“Political leaders whose policies deny more and more Americans the opportunity to earn a living wage in stable, safe jobs at home order some of the same men and women to the frontlines of Iraq where hundreds of our citizens have been killed and thousands wounded,” Eisenberg said. “It is unconscionable to deny economic opportunities to young Americans in the United States and then encourage them to risk their lives in Iraq to bring increased profits to the Halliburtons of the world.”

“We’re outsourcing the wrong jobs,” he added.

About TOP

Known as TOP, the UAW’s technical, office and professional department is one of the labor movement’s fastest growing. The department includes nearly 100,000 workers, representing approximately 15 percent of the UAW’s membership. Members include workers at manufacturing companies as well as in the public sector, health care, schools and universities, telecommunications and news media. They work in a wide range of occupations, including draftsmen, industrial designers, engineers, graphic designers and illustrators, computer specialists, health care professionals, social service workers, journalists and writers, curators and librarians, graduate teaching assistants and state and local government employees.

These include Michigan, Indiana and Kentucky state employees; service, clerical, technical and graduate student employees at more than 20 colleges and universities; artisans at Greenfield Village; the staffs of The Village Voice, Mother Jones, and The Stamford Advocate; technical and on-air staff of WDET, Detroit’s public radio station; workers at the three Detroit casinos, staff lawyers of the Legal Services Corporation; more than 5,000 members of the National Writers Union; and more than 3,000 members of the Graphic Artists Guild.

About UAW

UAW-represented workplaces range from multinational corporations, small manufacturers and state and local governments to colleges and universities, hospitals and private non-profit organizations.

The UAW has approximately 710,000 active members and over 500,000 retired members in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico.

There are more than 950 local unions in the UAW. The UAW currently has contracts with some 3,200 employers in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico.

A solid majority of the union's half-million retirees stay actively involved in the life of their union, participating in some 700 retiree chapters and playing a vital role in the UAW's community action program.

Since its founding in 1935, the UAW has consistently developed innovative partnerships with employers and negotiated industry-leading wages and benefits for its members. UAW members have benefited from a number of collective bargaining breakthroughs, including:

  • First employer-paid health insurance plan for industrial workers
  • First cost-of-living allowances
  • Pioneering role in product quality improvements
  • Landmark job and income security provisions
  • Comprehensive training and educational programs

From its earliest days, the UAW has also been a leader in the struggle to secure economic and social justice for all people. The UAW has been actively involved in every civil rights legislative battle since the 1950s, including the campaigns to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Fair Housing Act, the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1988 and legislation to prohibit discrimination against women, the elderly and people with disabilities.

UAW also has played a vital role in passing such landmark legislation as Medicare and Medicaid, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Employee Retirement Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act. In Washington and state capitols, the UAW is fighting for better schools for kids, secure health care and pensions for retirees, clean air and water, tougher workplace health and safety standards, stronger worker's compensation and unemployment insurance laws and fairer taxes.

The UAW's commitment to improve the lives of working men and women extends beyond America’s borders to encompass people around the globe. Through vigilant political involvement and coordination with world labor organizations, UAW fights for enforcement of trade agreement provisions on human and worker rights, fair labor standards and a new approach to international trade -- one that raises the quality of life for working people worldwide.

More information available at http://www.uawtop.org.

Contact:

Annie Rosa, Media Assistant

International Union, UAW, TOP Region 8

(954) 347-3001 Fax (954) 337-2981

Web: http://www.uawtop.org E-mail: annierosa@uawtop.org

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