Innovative Oil Clean Up Invention by a Chemical Engineering Professor Works-Receiving International Recognition

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A recovery ship carries a large tank filled with seawater. When the ship approaches an oil slick, it opens a series of holes in the bottom of the tank; the movement of the ship's hull forces the oil past the holes. Because oil is less dense than seawater, it rises to the top of the tank and gradually displaces all the seawater. The holes are then closed and the ship returns to dock to unload the oil. You can see a sketch of the boat at http://smartauthor.com/oilcleanup.html

Dr. Chaalal, Adjunct Professor of the Chemical Engineering and Process Department-United Arab Emirates University, has designed a tanker for recovering lost oil.

A recovery ship carries a large tank filled with seawater. When the ship approaches an oil slick, it opens a series of holes in the bottom of the tank; the movement of the ship's hull forces the oil past the holes. Because oil is less dense than seawater, it rises to the top of the tank and gradually displaces all the seawater. The holes are then closed and the ship returns to dock to unload the oil.

Explaining the technique, Dr Chaalal says the recovery ship carries a large tank filled with seawater.

When the ship approaches an oil slick, it opens a series of holes in the bottom of the hull to connect the water in the tank to the water outside. Just like a glass full of water which is upturned in a filled sink.

The water in the tank does not flood out as long as the holes remain unchanged. As the ship moves along, its specially designed hull shape forces any oil it encounters underneath the boat pass the holes.

"Because oil is less dense than seawater, it rises up through the holes to the top of the tank." Dr. Chaalal explains. "As the oil builds up in the tank, it gradually displaces the seawater until it contains nothing but oil. The holes are closed and the ship returns to dock to unload its catch."

Dr Mohamed said Dr Chaalal also demonstrated the technique using a 60cm long scale model in a tank containing a one-litre 'slick' of crude oil. To simulate sea conditions, the tank was agitated. In only a couple of minutes, the boat recovered 99 per cent of the oil.

Dr Will Hendry, Operations Supervisor for Briggs Environmental Services, a counter-pollution specialist based in Aberdeen, Scotland, said the idea will certainly be welcomed by the oil industry.

To see news releases about the invention go to the following sites:

http://www.sahra.arizona.edu/cgi-bin/newsclips/newsclip_view.pl?mode=newsclip_view&ID=6781

http://www.warwickboar.co.uk/?article=2097

2) This site is in German.

http://www.wiwo.de/pswiwo/fn/ww2/sfn/buildww/cn/cn_artikel/cn/bm_morecontent/id/156/id/17104/fm/0/fl/0/bt/2/SH/0/depot/0/

4) This site is in Italian. The last paragraph mentions Dr. Chaalal.

http://www.ecplanet.com/canale/ecologia-6/inquinamento-50/0/0/8040/it/ecplanet.rxdf

What makes Dr. Chalal's invention so desirable is that it does not use chemicals that can harm sea creatures and that

most of the recovered oil should be reusable. It can simply be reloaded into tankers and recycled.

The idea first occurred to Dr Chaalal when he was completing his doctorate studies at Newcastle Upon Tyne University in 1990. On joining the United Arab Emirates University he met Dr Mamdouh Ghannam, who was supervising two students who had an interest in oil spills. Chaalal took the opportunity to pursue his idea resulting in a successful laboratory demonstration in which 99 percent of a 1 litre ‘slick’ was cleared in two minutes.

Omar Chaalal believes his idea can “change the way of cleaning oil spills around the world." If he is right then millions of birds, fish and mammals may owe their survival to a university professor.

Dr. Chaalal has been serving the Chemical Engineering Department for several years, and has taught many courses including Introduction to Chemical Engineering, Advanced Separation Processes, Chemical Engineering Reaction, Physical and Organic Chemistry. He has contributed much to the research and has been involved in the publishing of many papers regarding the field of Environment and Chemical Engineering.

Integrated Management of Radioactive Strontium Contamination in Aqueous Stream Systems

Author(s): O. Chaalal

Source: Journal of Environmental Management (Academic

Press)

Year: 2001 Volume: 61 Number: 1 Pages: 51-59

Oil Spill Cleanup Using Vacuum Technique

Author(s): M.T. Ghannam; O. Chaalal

Source: Fuel (Elsevier Science)

Year: 2003 Volume: 82 Number: 7 Pages: 789-797

Use of Thermophilic Bacteria for Bioremediation of

Petroleum Contaminants

Author(s): Ibrahim M. A. Al-Maghrabi; A. O. Bin Aqil;

M. R. Islam; O. Chaalal

Source: Energy Sources (Taylor and Francis Ltd)

Year: 1999 Volume: 21 Number: 1 Pages: 17-29

A Novel Method for Heavy Metal Removal

Author(s): S. Mustafiz; A. Basu; A. Dewaidar; O. Chaalal

Source: Energy Sources (Taylor and Francis Ltd)

Year: 2002 Volume: 24 Number: 11 Pages: 1043-1051

Enhanced Oil Recovery from UAE Limestone Reservoirs Using Bacteria Flooding an Experimental Approach

Author(s): A.Y Zakri , R. Almehaideb and O. Chaalal

Source: Japanese Petroleum Institute Journal

Year: 2001 Volume: 44 Number: 5 Pages: 1043-1051

Oil spills are a costly mistake to the environment.

If you are concerned, would like to interview

Dr. Chaalal or discuss these matters with him, please contact him.

Dr. Omar CHAALAL

UGRU Math Lecturer

Adjunct Professor.

Chemical Engineering and Process

United Arab Emirates University

P.O Box 17172 Al-Ain Abu Dhabi

UAE

Tel (portable) 00971 504719118

Dr. Omar Chaalal

United Arab Emirates University

00971 504719118

ochaalal@yahoo.com

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