Bobby Jones’ 3 Simple Steps to Ruin a Perfectly Good Golf Swing

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The "slice" is probably the most common result of improper golf technique and it is suffered by most golf players. Over 3000 golfers searched for an online cure to this malady last month alone. Bobby Jones was a master at isolating/analyzing ineffective technique. He is also the subject of the new movie "Bobby Jones Stroke of Genius". Bobby is no longer with us but we are fortunate that he preserved his remedies for chronically bad golf in his writings. His prognosis/cure for the most common problems leading to a golf slice is as follows:

The "slice" is probably the most common result of improper golf technique and it is suffered by most golf players. Over 3000 golfers searched for an online cure to this malady last month alone.

Bobby Jones was a master at isolating/analyzing ineffective technique. He is also the subject of the new movie "Bobby Jones Stroke of Genius". Bobby is no longer with us but we are fortunate that he preserved his remedies for chronically bad golf in his writings. His prognosis/cure for the most common problems leading to a golf slice is as follows:

How to Ruin a Perfectly Good Golf Swing

1.    Tighten all the muscles in the left side of your body.

2.    Prevent your hips from turning fully throughout the swing.

3.    Jam your left elbow tightly against your ribs.    

Following these 3 simple steps, most golfers find it quite easy to contact the ball with an open face resulting in a “slice” and plenty of it.

Observe (image attached) that the correct action gives no hint of being retarded by sudden muscular contraction. The left hip is out of the way, and the left arm is swinging through straight along the line of play. To an observer standing behind the ball, in line with the shot, daylight would appear between the two arms. Notice too that the back of the left hand is presented toward the objective. Contact has been made, yet the right hand has neither passed nor climbed over the left. In no case should the left arm be stopped with the idea of throwing the club-head through.

The differences noted in these two swings have their root in one thing only. One player, having given the club-head all of the acceleration and direction at his command, is able to let it go—to trust it to its work. The other, apprehending that he may perhaps not have done enough, is still trying to do something when it is too late. His convulsive effort actually slows his club down instead of speeding it up.

For more tips from Bobby Jones or to download a newly released digital copy of his book "The Rights and Wrongs of Golf" please visit: http://www.golflegendsecrets.com (prices subject to change).

Bobby Jones' is perhaps the most respected and admired golf player to have walked the earth with the possible exception of Jack Nicklaus. From 1923 to 1930 he won thirteen major championships and remains the only player ever to win all four majors in the same year.

For further information, contact:

Ronald Grisanti 864-292-1114

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Ronald Grisanti

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