New Study Examines the Side Effects of Tubal Ligation known as "Post Tubal Syndrome" (PTS)

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The Coalition for Post Tubal Women (CPTwomen) announces the start of a new independent long term women's initiative Global PTS Health Study concerning the health status of women after they have had a tubal ligation. All women who have had a tubal ligation are invited to volunteer and participate.

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The Coalition for Post Tubal Women (CPTwomen) announces the start of a new independent long term women's initiative Global PTS Health Study concerning the health status of women after they have had a tubal ligation. All women who have had a tubal ligation are invited to volunteer and participate. Enrollment is ongoing.

Tubal ligation is the number one method of birth control used by women over age 30 in the U.S. Tubal ligation, sometimes called "tying the tubes", is an elective surgery in which the fallopian tubes are cut and sealed (electrocoagulation) or closed with clips or rings.

Pamphlets given to women from OBGYN doctors and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) list the risks associated with anesthesia and surgery in general and explain that tubal ligation is considered permanent, there is a possibility of failure, and sterilization does not protect them from sexually transmitted diseases. The pamphlets do not disclose information about negative side effects that are known by the medical community called post tubal syndrome or "PTS" (excessive bleeding, pelvic pain, and early onset of menopause) which occur for some women after tubal ligation. In the ACOG's September 2003 Practice Bulletin (a guideline for obgyn physicians), they informed their members that "the long-term health effects of tubal sterilization or menstrual pattern disturbance (post-tubal ligation syndrome) appear to be negligible."

"It is these negligible, untold side effects which we specifically want to gather data about", explains Susan Bucher, the Director of the CPTWomen. "The results are being published in 'real time' on the Internet and will ultimately be provided to scientific journals."

"This is the only study of its kind", explains Dr. Vicki Hufnagel, MD, "It is being supported by women who had tubal ligations and believe they have suffered from the procedure. Our population is selective, however, it is this population that has not been specifically evaluated at any time."

Volunteers are provided with an ID Number to protect their identity, a home FSH test kit that is approved for OTC use for women by the FDA, and access to an on-line study questionnaire. Participates are only asked to answer the study questions and provide information about their health. The study in whole is user provided content and data only. No medical treatments or checkups are required or provided.

The CPTwomen hope to show how the outcomes and conclusions of many of the referred to published studies are often times presented in ways that can be very misleading. Example: Coming the conclusion that tubal sterilization is not associated with an increased risk of menstrual dysfunction by collecting data from many women. Finding that some had heavier and more prolonged menstrual bleeding, some had stopped/less bleeding, and some had no change. The average of all shows no change in the number of days of the average cycle, or the amount of average blood loss. Never mind that some women completely stopped bleeding, and others cycles became heavy and prolonged.

The CPTwomen believes that their findings will also show that many young women who are two years or more post tubal will have elevated FSH levels. "While some of the women may report having bleeding or cycles, elevated FSH levels is a sign that they are not producing enough estrogen to maintain regular ovarian function", explains Dr. Hufnagel.

For more information about the CPTwomen, the Global PTS Health Study, or to enroll in the study, visit http://www.Tubal.org or call 815 834-0987.

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