The Westfield Leader Newspaper on their Aug 5th edition reviewed the autobiography of Franco Antonetti titled I Wouldn`t Die.

The coverage of the book was extraordinary as the writer was so taken by the book that she told the readers to stop reading the review and run out and buy the book.

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(PRWEB) August 28, 2004

Antonetti`s Book Tells How Trials,Tradegies Turned Into Triumph.

Franco Antonetti, who was born in Italy in 1944,proudly calls himself an American-Italian. Unlike the popular politically correct classification, Italian-American, Antonetti, a Gilbert Arizona resident, chooses the former phrase because he feels it fits him much better. Deeply proud of his Italian roots, Antonetti is also a proud and devoted American. He is, indeed, the epitome of someone who has lived the American Dream.

His memoir,"I Wouldn`t Die,"begins as a tale of a young boy in wartorn Italy. True to the title,young Franco had so many brushes with the grim reaper (including being dropped on his head and buried alive)that it borders on comical. However,while reading the witty and often poignant words of Antonetti, the reader realizes that little Franco has been blessed. Industrious from childhood, he was a child he learned the value of hard work at a painfully early age. Smart and physically strong, the young boy held down countless jobs in order to provide for his family. But this is not a depressing story.It is a tale of hope and miracles and the power of love.

With sausages stuffed into his pant legs, Antonetti arrived at Ellis Island in 1954. He lived with his family in Berkeley Heights and attended Columbia School. Learning English was difficult for him, but the young man persevered and later rose to extraordinary success at Mack Trucking.

He met the love of his life, young Bette Ann Korker, a local Fanwood girl, while working as a shoe salesman at the Blue Star Shopping Center. They married and had two children, Amie and Buddy. Their first home together was in Plainfield and they bravely continued on, even during the devastating Plainfield race riots.

By way of Pennsylvania, Georgia, and California, Antonetti, now retired, resides in Arizona. The Antonetti family suffered the tragic loss of Bette Ann in 1984, but again, this is an uplifting, if not inspiring story.

A brief secong marriage gave Franco another son, Adam and now Antonetti shares his life with his third wife, Teri, and their many grandchildren. He considers his life blessed.

"I Wouldn`t Die" is so well written that you cannot put it down. By the third page, you feel as if you are walking side by side with little Franco, sharing in his spectacular journey. Not all of it is pleasant, but every word is positive. Antonetti never once feels sorry for himself, even during some horrific times.

The most endearing quality of "I Wouldn`t Die" is how humorous it is. I laughed out loud every 10 pages or so and would go back and reread passages just so that I could experience them again. This is a remarkable tale of a remarkable man.

I stop here because I insist you run out right now and purchase this lovely memoir. "I Wouldn`t Die" is a slice-of-life story that deserves to be read by many. If you cannot find it in bookstores

please visit http://www.francoantonetti.com.


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