“Set Up” Your Children for Success - 5 Tips to Help you Talk to Your Teen About Their Future

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Are you prepared to spend $41,000 or more for a college degree your child will never use, and then watch him or her drift aimlessly from one job to another in search of Â?something that fitsÂ?? Some in-depth discussion with your teen can help them define their dreams and avoid a future mid-life crisis.

If You Could Be Anything, What Would You Be? A Teen’s Guide to Mapping Out the Future

– Are you prepared to spend $41,000 or more for a college degree your child will never use, and then watch him or her drift aimlessly from one job to another in search of “something that fits”? Some in-depth discussion with your teen can help them define their dreams and avoid a future mid-life crisis.

“Communication is key to helping our children develop real life skills needed to apply education to real life experience,” says Jeanne Webster, author of "If You Could Be Anything, What Would You Be? A Teen’s Guide to Mapping Out the Future." “Unfortunately, talking to teens about their future often poses a challenge.”

A certified life coach, Webster has helped hundreds of young people recognize their potential and discover how to attain an abundant, fulfilling life. Written in a workbook style, her book guides teens and young adults through a process of discovering their “perfect life” and shows them how to transform that vision into real life. Here Webster shares five tips to help you communicate more effectively with your teen on any topic, including his or her future:

1. Remember your intention. If your intention is to be loving and supportive, recall that before the discussion starts. It will set the tone for a solution-based discussion.

2. Be conscious of body language. “I love you” doesn’t come across the same if your arms are crossed, and you are tapping your foot and scowling.

3. Take note of timing. Don’t try to communicate when either of you is absorbed in another task. Give each other the full time and attention you deserve.

4. Consider your tone of voice. Make sure it is appropriate. Avoid sarcasm or yelling. Speak to your child as you would your best friend.

5. Negotiate. Your teens will be more willing to discuss and find solutions if you are open to their thoughts and ideas.

6. Avoid judgments. Allow your teen to have a perspective. If you always believe you’re right, your child will see no point in talking to you.

No matter what your teen is going through right now, open communication will provide the opportunity for you to help guide them successfully into the future. Get the FREE special report “The Art of Communication for Parents and Teens” at http://www.YouCouldBeAnything.com

CONTACT:

Jeanne Webster

(828) 342-4030

jeanne@YouCouldBeAnything.com

http://www.YouCouldBeAnything.com

"If You Could Be Anything, What Would You Be? A Teen’s Guide to Mapping Out the Future"

Dupuis North Publishing, 2004, ISBN: 0-9749199-0-X, $19.95; http://www.YouCouldBeAnything.com

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