The World Policy Institute at the New School and the Center for Advanced Studies in Science and Technology Policy present: Law Enforcement and National Security in the Information Age: Technology, Security, and Privacy in the 'War on Terror'

Share Article

The Global Information Society Project, a collaboration of the World Policy Institute and the Center for Advanced Studies, announces: "Law Enforcement and National Security in the Information Age: Technology, Security, and Privacy in the 'War on Terror'," a panel discussion with Barry Steinhardt, ACLU, Eben Moglen, Columbia University, Paul Rosenzweig, Heritage Foundation, and Heather Mac Donald, Manhattan Institute, to be moderated by Kim Taipale, Center for Advanced Studies and director of GISP, October 14, 2004, 6:00-7:30pm, Swayduck Auditorium, 65 Fifth Avenue, New York.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New York, NY USA, (PRWEB) October 07, 2004 - The World Policy Institute at the New School and the Center for Advanced Studies in Science and Technology Policy present:

Law Enforcement and National Security in the Information Age: Technology, Security, and Privacy in the 'War on Terror'

A panel discussion with:

Barry Steinhardt, Director of the Technology and Liberty Program, ACLU

Eben Moglen, Professor of Law, Columbia University

Paul Rosenzweig, Senior Legal Fellow, Heritage Foundation, and

Heather Mac Donald, Olin Fellow, Manhattan Institute, and Contributing Editor, City Journal

Moderated by

Kim Taipale, Executive Director, Center for Advanced Studies, and Director of the Global Information Society Project at the World Policy Institute

To be held on October 14, 2004, at 6:00-7:30 p.m. in the Swayduck Auditorium, First Floor, 65 Fifth Avenue (between East 13th and 14th Streets), New York, NY. Admission is free. RSVP 212-229-5808 ext. 101 or email dover AT newschool DOT edu to reserve seating.

Visit http://www.dialnsa.edu for a live webcast and online discussion.

Event announcement, speaker's bios, and links to background material available online at http://www.plensia.org .

About this program:

Security and liberty are not dichotomous rivals to be traded one for the other; rather, they are dual obligations of civil society each to be maximized within the constraints imposed by the other. How can these dual obligations of collective security and individual freedom, including privacy, best be achieved given current developments in information technologies and the threat of international terrorism? The panelists will offer their views on these and related issues. This panel discussion is the first in a series of public forums to be held as part of the Global Information Society Project's Program on Law Enforcement and National Security in the Information Age.

About the Global Information Society Project (http://www.global-info-society.org):

The Global Information Society Project is a collaborative research project between the World Policy Institute and the Center for Advanced Studies in Science and Technology Policy focused on information, communication and technology policy and related issues, especially as such policy impacts on the development of civil society, international relations, world trade, economic development, and national and global security.

About the Program on Law Enforcement and National Security in the Information Age (http://www.plensia.org):

New information technologies have the potential to significantly change how information is collected, shared and analyzed by law enforcement and national security agencies in response to certain perceived threats posed by transnational terrorism, international organized crime, cross-border criminal gangs, and cybercrime. These technologies can enable remote observation or transaction monitoring (surveillance and identification), easy access to distributed data (information sharing), and efficiencies in processing and analysis (automated data and traffic analysis and data mining).

Such developments, however, are challenging to political and legal systems, and social expectations, that are at least partially based on protecting certain civil liberties and individual freedoms by maintaining privacy through the "practical obscurity" of inefficient information access technologies and procedures. On the one hand there is a need to "connect the dots" through improved information sharing and analysis to provide for collective security and on the other hand the notion of individual liberty in free society is at least partially built on keeping the power to "connect the dots" out of the control of government agencies by maintaining or imposing inefficiencies through a system of checks and balances, due process and technical constraints.

The Global Information Society Project's Program on Law Enforcement and National Security in the Information Age seeks to examine these issues and to influence national and international decision makers at every level in both the public and private sectors by providing a forum for sound, objective analysis and discourse. In particular, the Program seeks to identify, examine, and articulate the key issues that lie at the intersection of technologically enabled change and existing practices in law enforcement and national security by presenting a series of public panel discussions, publishing articles in leading journals, and otherwise informing the public debate. The Program provides a non-partisan, independent forum for all viewpoints and is dedicated to working towards solutions that promote individual freedom, democracy and civil liberties while encouraging and protecting global and national security.

About the World Policy Institute (http://www.worldpolicy.org):

The World Policy Institute at New School University is a research and education policy center that seeks innovative solutions to critical problems facing the United States and the world. WPI has been a source of informed policy leadership for close to 40 years and is renowned for its cutting-edge analysis on managing the global market economy, constructing a workable system for collective security, and fostering civil society.

About the Center for Advanced Studies (http://www.advancedstudies.org):

The Center for Advanced Studies in Science and Technology Policy is a private, non-partisan research and advisory organization focused on information, technology, and national security policy and related issues.

For more information:

Visit the Global Information Society Web Site at http://www.global-info-society.org or email info AT global-info-society DOT org

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print