Do NCLB Results Match Promise? FCS Teachers Poll Says No

Share Article

After conducting a Poll of its teacher-members to examine their experiences with and opinions of NCLB, AAFCS reports that most FCS teachers say the new initiative has not been very effective.

– What's really going on with the new federal legislation entitled No Child Left Behind (NCLB)? The American Association of Family & Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) asked its primary and secondary school teacher-members in a new Poll.

Slightly more than 68 percent of the teachers indicated test scores or student performance had not improved in their classes since NCLB was implemented, while almost 32 percent felt they’d seen improvement.

Similar findings were reported for the question, “Do you think NCLB has enhanced or will enhance the education of children in America?” Of the teachers responding, 62 percent said they did not think NCLB had enhanced or would enhance the education of American children and, slightly more than 37 percent responded positively.

“In addition to finding out what our teachers had observed so far about the No Child Left Behind initiative’s effect on their schools and students, we wanted to know if family and consumer sciences (FCS) classes contribute to core academic skills of students, as called for in NCLB,” said Jim Moran, President of AAFCS. “According to the poll responses, the answer is a resounding ‘yes’ and FCS teachers seem to be continuing their emphasis on writing, reading, math and study skills while teaching critical life skills.”

The AAFCS Teacher Opinion Poll, a first of many anticipated national attempts to sample the opinions of people directly involved with implementing NCLB in the classroom, was distributed to 2,084 AAFCS teacher-members across the U.S. with access to e-mail. Response rate was 11.1 percent or 231 teachers.

The 231 teachers responding to the Opinion Poll reported teaching 51,373 students, almost 40 percent of whom were boys, in the 2003-2004 school year.

In a confirmation of their focus on the core subjects called for in NCLB, over 98 percent of the 231 respondents to the Poll indicated they were already teaching and reinforcing the core subjects (reading, writing, math and science) prior to the enactment of NCLB.

And, 52 percent said they have made adjustments to their curricula, which included additional applications for the core subjects.

“I have my students keep various types of journals in each of my classes and I grade them weekly or monthly to help improve writing skills. Math has always been used in each of my classes, however, now I include problem solving on their exams. And, I make sure that in each class I point out how science is used. We are doing a lot of applied sciences,” said one of the AAFCS teachers responding to the Poll.

About AAFCS and Obtaining Quotes/Interviews

Founded in 1909, AAFCS is the only not-for-profit 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to bringing people together to improve the lives of individuals, families, and communities. AAFCS’ more than 10,000 members are elementary, secondary, and post-secondary educators, researchers, and administrators, cooperative extension educators, and other professionals in business and industry, not-for-profit organizations, and government. These professionals develop, integrate, and provide practical knowledge about life skills—dietetics and nutrition, financial literacy; child care and parenting; conflict resolution; consumer education; safe and secure housing and environment; and apparel and textiles. For complete results and Quotes, please contact Linda Wilson using the contact information to the right of this release. Interviews with AAFCS teachers may be arranged through Linda Wilson or her staff.

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Linda Wilson
AAFCS
703-706-4609
Email >
Visit website