Doctors’ Tee-Time Diet gives golfers the edge on the back nine.

Golfers are notorious for eating hot dogs and drinking beer or some other comfort food at the turn. Little do they know that this can have a disastrous effect on their performance for the rest of the day. Dr. Howard Peiper studied golfers and in his book, Nutritional Leverage for Great Golf, outlines a program to improve your game. His Tee-Time Diet is structured depending on the time you start playing

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(PRWEB) April 7, 2004

Golfers are notorious for eating hot dogs and drinking beer or some other comfort food at the turn. Little do they know that this can have a disastrous effect on their performance for the rest of the day. Dr. Howard Peiper studied golfers and in his book, "Nutritional Leverage for Great Golf," outlines a program to improve your game. His Tee-Time Diet is structured depending on the time you start playing. For example, if you plan to play eighteen holes, you need a high protein meal to start the day and give you support for muscle tissue that provides adequate ball control, and stamina to walk the 18 holes.

Prior to teeing off, a long-term energy carbohydrate food would give a boost to get you going. Snacks on the course should be structured again for long-term stamina. Any short-term low-carb energy foods eaten for a quick burst during a demanding hole, should be followed by a long-term carbohydrate food within one half-hour to prevent a blood sugar low, and resultant fatigue.

This plan is based on maintaining your energy at an even level. Sustaining adequate carbohydrate levels by eating a slow-release Low-glycemic food during play regardless of your appetite will prevent radical blood sugar highs or lows. After the game, you can choose carbohydrate foods that have a high-Glycemic Index (fast-release), which can provide a quicker recovery from stressed muscles. According to Dr. Uma Viswanathan, M.D., C.C.N., “watching your blood sugar is just as important as watching your score card. If you eat sensibly, you can improve your stamina and concentration and have a great game of golf.”    

The Tee Time Diet was constructed by Dr. Peiper in collaboration with Nina Anderson, ISSA Specialist in Performance Nutrition, Dr. Uma Viswanathan, M.D., C.C.N., who practices in Ridgefield, CT. and Neil Orenstein, Ph.D., formerly affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital and Beth Israel Hospital (Harvard Medical School) in Boston. The diets encompass tee times of early and late morning, early afternoon and late or evening golf times. They not only give a menu to follow but offer many snack foods that can enhance your ability to golf at your best. For instance Dr. Piper recommends that golfers carry a big bottle of mineral water or unsugared low-carb sports drink. Snacks to munch on include apples, grapes, sunflower seeds (high in potassium), nuts, celery sticks, granola (no sugar added), sports bar (slow release ingredients). Snacks allowed for the last hour of play, include quick-release foods such as bananas, raisins, or quick-release energy bar.

If you play two days in a row allow one hour after happy hour to give fast-release foods time to digest and remove sugars from stomach. Then make dinner choices from slow-release energy food such as pasta with meatless tomato sauce or pesto, salad, meatless lasagna, vegetables, beans, rice, fish, peas, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes and refrain from dessert. Beverages should include only mineral water, herbal tea, slow-energy sports drink. If you need an alcoholic drink, choose wine rather than a high-sugar liquor. More details on this diet can be found in "Nutritional Leverage for Great Golf" http://www.safegoodspub.com or available at bookstores nationwide.