Million Dollar Dime in World's Largest Rare Coin Auction

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A rare U.S. dime valued at $1 million is one of the 15,000 coins with a combined value of more than $40 million that will be sold by Heritage Galleries of Dallas, Texas in the world's largest rare coin auction in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, January 12 - 15.

A rare U.S. dime valued at $1 million and three gold coins made by George Washington's neighbor are some of the 15,000 items included in the world's largest rare coin auction to be conducted by Heritage Galleries of Dallas, Texas (http://www.HeritageCoins.com), the world's largest collectibles auction company, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, January 12 - 15.

The precedent-setting auction will be held during one of the country's largest rare coin conventions, the Florida United Numismatists (FUN) convention, and is expected to bring at least $40 million in winning bids, smashing the previous world record of $30 million set in January 2003 by Heritage Galleries.

Highlights of the auction include a rare dime struck in 1894 at the San Francisco Mint and valued today at $1 million.

"Mint records indicated only 24 dimes were produced that year in San Francisco, but only ten are known to exist today. This is one of the finest known examples," said Greg Rohan, President of Heritage Galleries.

The sale also contains three gold coins hand-struck in New York City in 1787 by George Washington's Cherry Street neighbor and long-time friend, Ephrain Brasher. Brasher was a silversmith and a top New York City politician, who presented these coins as proposed currency for the young United States.

"Only ten of the historically important 'Brasher doubloon' gold pieces survive. These three have a combined value today of at least $5 million," said Rohan.

Other sale highlights include 300 pieces of colorful paper money produced from the 1860s to late 1920s that were kept for decades in the closet of a Yonkers, New York apartment. Valued today at $1 million, the historic bank notes were assembled by a studious collector who frugally bought the notes in the 1940s and 1950s on his modest salary as a New York subway motorman.

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