The Indian Ocean Tsunami and Atlantis Linked

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The current disaster in the Indian Ocean that affected Indonesia (Sumatra), Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, and many islands is part of the same geological system that destroyed Atlantis, according to at least one researcher.

The current disaster in the Indian Ocean that affected Indonesia (Sumatra), Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, and many islands is part of the same geological system that destroyed Atlantis, according to at least one researcher.

Most people think of Atlantis as a mythological civilization in the Atlantic Ocean, says Bill Lauritzen, an independent scholar. “To the ancient Egyptians, who were the first to start the Atlantis story, the Atlantic Ocean was the entire ocean surrounding Africa.” Lauritzen points out that the Pacific Ocean was not named until 1519 by Magellan—long after the Atlantis story. Thus, other areas besides the current Atlantic Ocean should be considered as possibilities for Atlantis.

In his new book, "The Atom and the Soul," Lauritzen claims that the Sunda Plain of Indonesia fits Plato’s Atlantis story quite well. It has elephants, coconuts, a large fertile plain, geological activity, tsunamis, a wide variety of flora and fauna, and canals. All of these elements are mentioned in Plato’s story. The many other locations suggested for Atlantis, such as Spain, the island of Thera, Antarctica, North Africa, the Bahamas, Great Briton, and Mexico do not contain all these elements. “Just read Plato’s story, and make up your own mind. It’s available online,” says Lauritzen. “One comes away feeling that Atlantis was somewhere in Southeast Asia. Oral tradition could have easily carried the tale of destruction to Egypt through the Red Sea. The Egyptians then told it to the Greeks.”

Lauritzen also points out several other disasters in the area such as the 1883 eruption of Krakatau that killed 35,000 people in the resulting tsunami, a possible 535 AD eruption of Krakatau, and the 1006 AD eruption of Mount Merapi, which destroyed the Mataram civilization. “The whole island of Sumatra is slowing turning like a forearm, with the elbow at Krakatau,” he points out. “This region of the world is the most geologically active on the planet. Indian Ocean core sediments show that there have been about 10 huge volcanic eruptions in the last 950,000 years.”

Lauritzen, who is also an adjunct faculty at Los Angeles City College, says that the current tragedy deserves our immediate attention, “People should donate money to one of the various relief organizations.”

His book’s complete title is: "The Atom and the Soul: A Bold New View of the Origin of Science and Religion." It is currently available for download as an ebook at http://www.earth360.com.

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Bill Lauritzen

310-305-1987

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