Organize All Your Gear!

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World's only product designed to hold and organize all types of Biker's gear.

For the avid rider, there is nothing more exhilarating than the wind in your face and the wide open road in your sights. Your bike looks great. And so do you—decked out in your favorite helmet, do-rag, goggles, gloves, chaps, and boots. But, after your invigorating ride, where on earth do you put all your rider-related accessories? Wherever you can, which usually means scattering your gear around the garage, where it inevitably creates clutter, and become breeding grounds for mold and mildew.

Finally, there is a biker-savvy solution: The Biker’s Rack, Created by Bikers for Bikers. The Biker’s Rack is an attractive, lightweight, yet durable device that offers ingenious storage. The black steel grid hangs effortlessly on your garage or trailer wall, saving space, protecting your gear, and replacing pre- and post-ride chaos with remarkable convenience. Its solid-steel construction is powder coated, making it scratch and scuff resistant.

The Biker’s Rack only weighs 10 pounds, but holds up to 150 pounds of gear. It takes up less than a yard of wall space, but holds up to 12 helmets. Each Biker’s Rack is designed to be custom-fit for each rider. Customers can choose between special hooks, baskets, shoe/glove horns, and accessories to meet individual needs and preferences. A biker’s ride is made to order. Now his or her storage racks can be, as well.

Daniel Stephens, a Huntsville publisher and motorcycle enthusiast, invented the Biker’s Rack with friend and fellow rider, Scott Locke, after discovering a definite need. “I had helmets hanging on lawn mowers and on the tool box. I had sweaty gloves and do-rags stuffed in cabinets and drawers. It was wearing my wife out,” explains Stephens. I knew there had to be an easier way to store all this stuff. One day, I just started drawing pictures, and came up with the grid and it just made sense.” But it was Stephens’ wife, Susan—another motorcycle enthusiast—who came up with the concept of detachable hooks. That idea led to the custom-design concept that makes the Biker’s Rack a truly unique commodity.

The first Biker’s Rack rolled off the production line in September 2003, under Stephens’ newly formed company, The Biker’s Resource, Inc. Countless customers already relish the Rack’s benefits, and say they can’t imagine life without this innovative product. “Before we got one, we were constantly fussing about where our biker gear was before each ride. It was never in the same place, and it created a lot of pre-ride anxiety,” says Shonda Cazer. “Now we always know where to look. Our gear is organized and kept in the same location. Now there is no more pre-ride anxiety, and our rides are so much better.”

Not only does the Biker’s Rack add convenience and order, it helps protect the gear that is so crucial to the motorcycle enthusiast. The 6.6 million riders who spend an estimated $7.5 billion a year on new bikes are also spending big bucks on their gear and accessories. The Biker’s Rack enables you to protect those investments, as well.

Perhaps even more importantly, the Biker’s Rack lets your gear breathe between rides. Imagine the sweat that’s absorbed by your helmet and gloves during a hot ride. And what about the rain that occasionally drenches your fine leathers? Put them in a closet, cabinet, or drawer, and mildew, mold, and bacteria will fester and grow. Instead, hang them on the Biker’s Rack, where air can filter through them, and dry them out quickly and cleanly. Which helmet would you rather put on your head after a two-day rest? Plus, with the Biker’s Rack, your leathers will actually hold their shapes instead of caving in.

Overall, the motorcycle market is evolving and today’s typical rider is older and more upscale than he or she was 25 years ago; that is, in part, why there is now such a demand for a product like the Biker’s Rack. “For a guy like me who is so disorganized, it’s perfect,” says Joe Bongiovanni, the owner of one of North Alabama’s top car dealerships. ”It’s nice to have all my gear in once place. I love it.” Veteran riders, like Bongiovanni, are no longer satisfied with their gear strewn about, collecting dust, mold, and mildew. They want to protect their accessories and gear, including boots, just as they do their bikes.

Stephens first experienced the thrill of riding when his father bought him a mini-bike when he was just five years old. Today, he enjoys the same excitement and freedom when he revs up his 2003 Harley-Davidson 100th Anniversary Edition Heritage Soft Tail. It’s fully loaded. And, as you might imagine, so is the Deluxe Biker’s Rack hanging on the garage wall in front of it. “It’s awesome. I love the bike. And I love having the Biker’s Rack to keep all our gear nice and neat. Going for a ride is never a hassle, because we know right where everything is—it’s right there on the Biker’s Rack, just inches from the Harley.”

The Biker’s Rack is the first of its kind available to consumers. It starts at $99.95 (though dealer prices may vary), and comes with a lifetime warranty. The Biker’s Rack is available at select retail outlets in North Alabama and Tennessee. You can also order by phone and online. Find out more by calling 1-800-611-7484, or by logging on to Stephens’ website at http://www.bikersrack.com.

Incidentally, Stephens is a very strong supporter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation (http://www.wish.org). This non-profit organization helps ailing children fulfill their dreams, like going to Disney World, or becoming a country music star. In addition to the contributions he already makes to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, from now until December 31st 2005, Stephens contributes $5.00 of each Deluxe Biker’s Rack sale to this extremely-worthy cause.

By the way, the Biker’s Rack is just the beginning. Keep your eyes out for the Rider’s Rack, designed for snowmobile and ATV accessories, along with the All Gear Rack, designed for athletic gear, such as football helmets, knee pads, and even rollerblades.

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Daniel Stephens
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