Survey by Diet.com Reveals Lull in Romantic Mood around Valentine's Day

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How does Valentine's Day, the most romantic time of the year, affect the passionate but slightly overweight American majority? The recent Diet.com survey of 2,862 dieters concluded that despite their warm feelings, many in AmericaÂ?s plump population may be left out in the cold.

Valentine’s Day may look a little colder this year. So say dieters in a recent survey conducted by Diet.com.

While Valentine’s Day usually calls to mind images of soft candlelight and romantic dinners, increasingly Americans are reporting that they’re “not in the mood” for romance because of their weight. Over 42% of respondents in the Diet.com survey reported that they “definitely” or “most likely” would not be passionate on Cupid’s day, primarily because of their size.

An additional 20% reported that they may avoid intimacy because of their weight, leaving only 38% who asserted their size would not affect their sex life.

As Valentine's Day approaches and many of us gear up for the most romantic time of the year, just how does this affect the passionate but slightly overweight American majority? The recent Diet.com survey of 2,862 dieters concluded that despite their warm feelings, many in America’s plump population may be left out in the cold.    

“Being overweight leads to fatigue, depression, and a host of other health concerns,” says Dr. Robert Kushner, author of the American Medical Association's Obesity Treatment Guide for Physicians and Medical Director of Diet.com. “It’s no surprise that so many overweight Americans feel a little less romantic.”

America has a population of dieters that have tended to overlook the role of behavior patterns and personality traits in weight loss. Problems compound at certain times of the year, especially when we encounter emotional events. These emotions often lead to further unhealthy eating and weight gain. Valentines Day represents a particularly hazardous time for dieters as emotional levels may be at a high, spurring further bouts of emotional eating.

“Overweight individuals can feel very vulnerable and self-conscious about their bodies,” says Kate Leighton, Diet.com’s Community Leader. “Exposing themselves to potential rejection, even from a loved one, can often seem too threatening. Diet.com’s discussion boards are full of posts about issues like this.”

The National Center for Health Statistics reports that 65% of American’s were overweight in 1999-2002, up from 47% in the previous survey period of 1976-1980.

The solution for lovelorn dieters? According to Dr. Kushner, addressing all 3 dimensions of a person’s lifestyle - eating, exercising, and coping - is the key to weight loss success. “Breaking unhealthy old habits can be done,” he assures us. “Just take one habit at a time.”

Diet.com strives to help reverse the trend of the expanding American waistline by providing an innovative new approach to weight loss, tailored to each dieter’s unique personality and lifestyle. To learn more about your own personality type, visit http://www.Diet.com to take a Diet Personality Assessment.

About Dr. Robert Kushner

Dr. Kushner, Medical Director of Diet.com, is also author of the American Medical Association's Obesity Treatment Guide for Physicians. Dr. Kushner’s individualized Personality Diet approach has been proven to help people lose weight and keep it off successfully. Dr. Kushner is also Medical Director of Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s Wellness Institute and President of the American Board of Nutrition Physician Specialists.

About Diet.com

Diet.com offers a highly personalized weight loss program using a validated personality test, customized weight loss strategies, and an energizing social networking model. A partnership between renowned weight loss expert, Dr. Robert Kushner and veteran online community pioneers, Diet.com sets to establish the new standard of online weight loss service which is trusted by users, endorsed by experts, and proven to deliver lasting results.

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