2nd Issue of The Deli Released March 25; Todd P, Best NYC Indie Rock Party Impresario, and 1970s NYC New Wave Scene Featured; Launch Party at Sin-é with Over 200 People

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The second issue of The Deli hit New York City streets on Friday, March 25, following its successful launch at the end of 2004, with expanded review and feature sections, and a new bi-monthly publication schedule. The second issue launch party, with more than 200 people attending, was held on March 25 at Sin-é (150 Attorney Street) with performances by Hopewell, Mudville, Nicole Atkins in 3D, The Epochs and Hello Nurse.

The second issue of The Deli hit New York City streets on Friday, March 25, following its successful launch at the end of 2004, with expanded review and feature sections, and a new bi-monthly publication schedule.

Editor-in-Chief Paolo De Gregorio commented, “Based on the great response from readers and advertisers for the launch issue, we have decided to publish on a more frequent basis, and really delve into the NYC indie music scene – past, present and future.”

Two feature articles in the March 2005 issue are prime examples of this. The first is an interview with Todd P, who in a short time has become NYC’s underground scene impresario, organizing major parties in official and unofficial Brooklyn venues to promote innovative and theatrical music. The second is a reprint from Piero Scaruffi’s book, A History of Rock Music, which focuses on a period of explosive creativity in NYC’s indie music history, the New Wave boom of 1976-1977. Additional reprints from Scaruffi’s book will appear in upcoming issues of The Deli.

Artists highlighted in this issue include: Hopewell (led by ex-Mercury Rev Jason Russo), Mudville, Inouk, Langhorne Slim, Aqui, Clap Your Hands and Say Yeah, Dirty on Purpose, Man on Earth and the Colour Guard.

The March 2005 issue also features the second half of an article on home recording by Bruce Kaphan, as well as articles on the latest mp3-related trend – podcasting, and cost-effective computers for home recording.

The Deli’s second issue launch party was held on March 25 at Sin-é (150 Attorney Street) with performances by Hopewell, Mudville, Nicole Atkins in 3D, The Epochs and Hello Nurse. More than 200 people attended and were blown away by Hopewell’s incredible set.

The Deli is distributed in music venues, record shops, alternative cafes, rehearsal and recording studios and music schools in the Lower East Side, East Village, West Village, Chelsea, Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Park Slope. It is also distributed to 300 college radio stations across the U.S.A. and in the Northeast through Highbury Comics. The Deli is free in NYC, and $2 anywhere else in the U.S.A. Subscriptions for 6 issues are $12 and can be purchased at http://www.thedelimagazine.com/subscribe.html.

About The Deli

The Deli, focused on the New York City music scene, was launched in December 2004. The Deli covers the underground rock, pop and folk bands that fill the city’s bars, clubs and concert venues, as well as the studios, producers, promoters, equipment retailers and manufacturers who help bring the NYC indie sound to the wider public. The Deli provides news and in-depth interviews with local bands, analyses of where the scene is headed, CD and equipment reviews and features, as well as classified advertising space for bands, studios, and others. The first magazine of its kind focused wholly on New York City, The Deli is available free of charge at music-oriented locations across the city, and for sale outside NYC and by subscription.

For more information about The Deli, please visit http://www.thedelimagazine.com.

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Harry Leff