New Manhattan Writer’s Space Builds a Community of Creative Professionals

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At The Village Quill, New York City writers can get away from the cramped walls of their apartments Â? or the distractions of their roommates or kids Â? and work more efficiently in a place dedicated to the literary success of its members. All for the cost of a gym membership.

When Gabriel Fried, a Soho poet and soon-to-be dad, needed space to write now that his office has become a nursery, he joined The Village Quill, a new writer’s workspace in Tribeca.

Located in a historic loft at 106 Franklin St., The Village Quill provided Mr. Fried with a spacious desk, high-speed wireless Internet access, as well as a lounge and library.

“I've tried writing in cafes, but even the most conducive of them have major distractions,” says Mr. Fried, who is expecting his first child in June. “The Quill is a beautiful space that has a seriousness to it, a sense of purpose. Everyone is there to write. It's sacrosanct.”

The lack of adequate space is the classic and near universal challenge for New York City’s freelance writers. In a fast-paced city with more writers and publishers than any in the world, its legendary shoe-box sized apartments and cash-strapped public libraries have often posed a challenge to a writer’s productivity. And for many of New York’s freelancers, novelists, and poets, the local Starbucks just doesn’t help a writer’s all-important need for focus.

At The Village Quill, writers can get away from the cramped walls of their apartments – or the distractions of their roommates or kids – and work more efficiently in a place dedicated to the literary success of its members. All for the cost of a gym membership.

“As a freelance writer for over six years, I went stir crazy in my small apartment,” says Harry Bruinius, an award-winning journalist who founded The Village Quill. “So, when I finished my first book, I used part of my advance to renovate this Tribeca loft and build a community of creative professionals.”

In addition, members often meet to discuss their work with peers at The Village Quill. Whether through Quill-sponsored happy hours or informal talks in the loft’s lounge area, writers get both the solitude they need and the sense of community they crave.

Since it opened in January, 2005, The Village Quill has been a haven for a number of work-at-home writers, including journalists from The New York Times, published novelists, and television screenwriters.

To continue to build a community of creative professionals, The Village Quill also hosts monthly art openings, regular author readings, and writers workshops for emerging authors.

For further information, go to http://www.villagequill.com, or call 212.226.0442.

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