Alzheimer's Disease Drug Market to Exceed $5 Billion by 2009

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Currently more than 10% of Americans age 65 or older suffer from AlzheimerÂ?s disease.

Alzheimer’s is a degenerative disease that will affect 10 million people in the G7 countries by 2009. Currently more than 10% of Americans age 65 or older suffer from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), of which only a quarter receive AD drug medications. The advent of new drugs has revolutionized AD care. According to Millennium Research Group’s new Global Markets for Alzheimer’s Disease Medications 2005, the market for AD drug therapy in the US, Europe, and Japan will generate over $3 billion in 2005, with the US accounting for over 60% of market revenues. As aging baby boomers throughout the developed world enter the high-risk years for AD, the market for AD drugs will grow rapidly, reaching $5.5 billion by 2009.

In its new report, Millennium Research Group (MRG) measures the influence of a range of trends and new developments on the use of AD drugs in the US, Europe, and Japan. By separating mild–moderate from moderate–severe indications, and existing treatments from future practices, the report forecasts 15% annual growth over the next five years. In addition to predicting the continued dominance of Eisai (ESALY.PK)/Pfizer’s (PFE) Aricept, and the strong growth of memantine-based drugs such as Forest Laboratories’ (FRX) Namenda, other companies covered in the report include: Andrómaco Laboratories, Bracco, First Horizon Pharmaceutical Corp (FHRX), Janssen Pharmaceutica (JNJ), Laboratorios Esteve, Lundbeck (HLUKF.PK), Merz Pharma, Novartis (NVS), OTL Pharma, Shire Pharmaceuticals (SHPGY), and Sigma-Tau Research, Inc.

MRG is a leading player in health care competitive intelligence. With over 50 analysts and researchers, we publish over 80 reports on the global health care market annually.

Contact Information:

Nilesh Patel

Millennium Research Group Inc.,

+1 (416) 364-7776 ext. 121

npatel@mrg.net

http://www.mrg.net

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