New Career Skills Sparks A Career Change--Train To Be An Electrician

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New Career Skills the nationwide provider of training in plumbing, carpentry and electrics for mature career changers, has launched a new, flexible learning electrician course to address the shortage issue. The electrician training course enables men and women of any age to re-train and change career with ease.

By 2008 Great Britain will be short of 36,700 electricians unless 7,340 electricians join the profession every year.*

Reasons for shortages include limited capacity within colleges to address the problem and oversubscription on courses. With new building regulation, Part P introduced in January 2005, the demand for skilled electricians is sure to increase further.

Aiming to reduce injuries and accidents in the home, Part P stipulates any significant electrical work in a household must be carried out by a qualified and registered electrician. If a householder does decide to do the work, it will have to be checked by local authority building inspectors who will charge for doing so.

New Career Skills the nationwide provider of training in plumbing, carpentry and electrics for mature career changers, has launched a new, flexible learning electrician course to address the shortage issue. The electrician training course (http://www.electricianscareer.co.uk) enables men and women of any age to change career with ease.

New Career Skills offer a flexible, blended learning program that allows students to complete the theory part of their training at home using interactive materials and tutor support. Then, when ready, students can complete practical sessions at one of New Career Skills’ nationwide centers of Electrical Excellence. This training program provides a stepping stone to achieving an NVQ 3.

As well as offering a complete change in lifestyle, electricians' hours of work are flexible suiting people with families and other commitments as opposed to the regimented 9am-5pm of office jobs.

Commenting, Tim Adderson, managing director, New Career Skills, said: "The UK shortage of electricians is a huge problem affecting us all. Younger students aren't as enthusiastic about learning a trade and are more interested in entering office-based careers or studying for vocational degrees. The introduction of building regulations such as Part P should also have an affect on the demand for skilled electricians.

We have answered the needs of both the industry and mature career changers, many who have work and family commitments and can't afford to take weeks off work to train."

For more information about electrician courses please go to http://www.electricianscareer.co.uk

*(Construction Skills Regional Foresight Report 2004).

Contact:

Chris Addison

08707669196

chrisa@newcareerskills.co.uk

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