National Micro Lab Develops Mold Guidelines

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Clearwater-based Microbiology lab’s decade-long research establishes important fundamental guidelines for air quality practitioners and consumers. For more than twenty years, health problems stemming from building-related biological and non-biological materials have been on the rise, yet indoor air quality professionals and consumers have lacked a starting point by which to compare bacterial and fungal bioaerosol results in a presently unregulated industry. Until now.

For more than twenty years, health problems stemming from building-related biological and non-biological materials have been on the rise, yet indoor air quality professionals and consumers have lacked a starting point by which to compare bacterial and fungal bioaerosol results in a presently unregulated industry. Until now.

“To date, the industry, both private and public, has not been able to establish a basis by which to measure the baseline conditions for indoor airborne bacteria and fungi,” said Alan Wozniak, President and CEO of Pure Air Control Services. “With our extensive environmental background and multiple-disciplined experience spanning over 500 million square feet of residential and commercial building space, we have been able to provide bioaerosol guidelines that are being used to determine what is normal in a home or building environment.”

At the recent 2005 American Industrial Hygiene Conference Expo in Anaheim, California, Dr. Rajiv Sahay announced the results of a decade-long study on airborne culturable bioaerosols in a presentation entitled “Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ): A 10-Year Case Study for Industry IEQ Guidelines” to an audience of over 450 industry professionals.

As one of about twenty-five Ph.D. Aerobiologists in the world, Dr. Sahay, Laboratory Manager for the Environmental Diagnostics Laboratory (EDLab™)¹ in Clearwater, FL, has spent the past ten years collaborating with colleagues Dr. Monroe King, Alan Wozniak, CIAQP, Francisco Aguirre, CIAQP, Dr. James Kimbrough, Mark Wozniak, MBA, CIAQP and Dr. Tomas Tamulis regarding bioaerosol issues. They collectively recognized the importance of introducing IEQ guidelines to assist in establishing normal background bioaerosol numbers for building indoor environments and thus began compiling data for this important aerobiological exploration.

“There are many charlatans and shamans in the indoor air quality industry today. In an unregulated industry, this can wreak havoc to the uninformed consumer,” said Mr. Wozniak. “It was for that reason, among others, that we felt compelled to diligently assess our inter-relational database and provide industry guidelines.”

The Environmental Diagnostics Laboratory has gone through the steps to become one of the elite American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) accredited environmental microbiology laboratories in the U.S.

“Upon establishing the laboratory, it was our intent to accumulate the data to begin documenting realistic microbiological guidelines and standards,” said Mr. Wozniak. “Since it’s inception, we have invested a lot of time and money in developing not only a state-of-the-art microbiology laboratory, but also in developing the proprietary inter-relational database called Computer Assisted Air Management Program (CAAMP) by which to compare airborne culturable bioaerosols.”

Throughout the decade-long study, more than eleven thousand indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal samples were taken in and around over seven thousand commercial and residential test sites across the United States. The outcome of Dr. Sahay’s study provides important normative data on culturable bioaerosols for both fungi and bacteria that have been applied to other sectors of business.

“Our industrial hygiene protocols and laboratory guidelines have been utilized in many important indoor environmental quality expert testimony cases,” said Mr. Wozniak.

Dr. Sahay’s suggested guidelines for airborne culturable bioaerosols for indoor environmental quality are designed to help consumers, IAQ technicians, building diagnosticians, environmental scientists and other air quality professionals gain a better understanding with relation to building conditions, indoor air quality and bioaerobiology.

“Since Dr. Sahay’s indoor environmental quality presentation, hundreds of industry professionals have requested a copy of the proposed guidelines; a clear indicator of the need for guidelines and standardization,” stated Mr. Wozniak.

“Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ): A 10-Year Case Study for Industry IEQ Guidelines” is the first of many indoor air quality studies presented by the Environmental Diagnostics Laboratory from the data garnered over the ten-year time period.

For more information, please contact the Environmental Diagnostics Laboratory by calling (800) 422-7873 ext. 301. To obtain a copy of Dr. Sahay’s 10-year study presentation, please visit Pure Air Control Services website at http://www.pureaircontrols.com, click on the 10-year study icon and enter the required information.

¹Environmental Diagnostics Laboratory (EDLab™) is a division of Pure Air Control Services, Inc.

About Pure Air Control Services:

Pure Air Control Services is interdisciplinary indoor environmental consulting firm providing IEQ consulting services to city, county, state and federal governments, school boards and the private sectors. They have an in-house AIHA accredited environmental diagnostics laboratory providing environmental microbiology/microscopy services as well as building/HVAC system remediation services. Pure Air Control Services family of IEQ services includes: Environmental Diagnostics Laboratory (EDLab) http://www.EDLab.org; Building Health Check http://www.BuildingHealthCheck.com; Building Remediation Sciences http://www.pureaircontrols.com/buildrem.html. Contact can be made at info@pureaircontrols.com; http://www.pureaircontrols.com; Phone 1-800-422-7873 ext 802.

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Alan Wozniak