Don’t Be a Victim of Ignored E-mail Anymore. Learn How to “Write It Right”

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WeÂ?ve all experienced e-mail anticipation. You spend a half-hour crafting the Â?perfectÂ? e-mail message. You send it off and wait for a response. Instead of returning a prompt reply like you had hoped, the other person ignored your message. Why? The answer may lie in your writing skills.

We’ve all experienced e-mail anticipation. You spend a half-hour crafting the ‘perfect’ e-mail message. You send it off and wait for a response. And you wait. And you wait. Finally, you surmise a computer malfunction must have occurred, and your message never made it to your recipient. So you send the message off again, hopeful that this time you will get a response.

Chances are that your e-mail did, in fact, wind up in your recipient’s in-box. But instead of returning a prompt reply like you had hoped, the other person ignored your message. Why? As authors Dawn Josephson and Lauren Hidden explain in their new book, "Write It Right…The Ground Rules™ for Self-Editing Like the Pros" (Cameo Publications, $17.95, ISBN: 0-97449662-6), the answer may lie in your writing skills.

First, check your subject line. Does it lack information or is it sales-y? Be honest. If you saw that subject line in your in-box from an unknown sender would you open it? Probably not. Busy people will not waste their time opening what they perceive to be junk e-mail. And, depending on their computer settings, your e-mail might have even been caught in the trenches of their spam filter.

Second, look at your grammar, spelling and punctuation. Even the smallest grammatical error, misspelled word or inappropriate punctuation mark (or lack of) can make you look unprofessional and sloppy. If you’re making a pitch and you send it out with these kinds of errors, your target will question your attention to detail and wonder if you’re the best person to represent their company.

Finally, review your style. When you typed your message did you keep in mind who would be reading it? You wouldn’t use the same tone in an informal e-mail to your best friend as you would in a sales pitch to a CEO of a Fortune 500 company, would you? Word selection is vital. Using convoluted words that aren’t part of everyday language is just as irritating to your reader as using over-simplified terms. The important thing is to always remember who will be reading what you’re writing.

Dawn Josephson, the Master Writing Coach™, is a professional speaker and internationally acclaimed author who empowers leaders to master the printed word for enhanced credibility, positioning, and profits. She is the founder and president of Cameo Publications, LLC and is the creator of The Ground Rules™ book series. Lauren Hidden is the founder and president of The Hidden Helper, LLC, an editorial and virtual assistance services firm. Her clients include professional speakers, authors, real estate professionals and entrepreneurs.

For more information or a review copy of "Write It Right…The Ground Rules™ for Self-Editing Like the Pros," please call 866-372-2636 or send an e-mail to Kimberly@cameopublications.com.

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Kimberly King