As FDA Approves Heart Disease Drug for African Americans, Guide Helps Inform Black Women about Heart Disease Prevention and Treatment

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On June 23, the FDA approved a heart disease drug called BiDil; with the recent news over this new drug, heart disease prevention for women (especially African Americans) is an issue that many may realize has been overlooked. In addition to the introduction of this drug, a book called "The African American's Guide to a Healthy Heart" arms women with valuable information.

The African American Woman's Guide to a Healthy Heart

On June 23, the FDA approved a heart disease drug called BiDil; with the recent news over this new drug, heart disease prevention and treatment for women (especially African Americans) is an issue that many may realize has been overlooked. In addition to the introduction of this drug, a book called "The African American's Guide to a Healthy Heart" arms women with valuable information.

A poll taken by the American Heart Association asked women what they considered to be their major health threat. Sixty-one percent identified cancer as their main health concern, while only seven percent identified heart disease. The reality is that women are twice as likely to die from heart disease as from cancer. This news is of particular importance to African-American women, who are at higher risk for death and disability from heart disease and stroke than any other ethnic group. They also get these diseases at younger ages and are sixty-nine percent more likely to die from them.

In "The African American Woman's Guide to a Healthy Heart," (Hilton Publishing, edited by Anne L. Taylor, M.D., Director of the Association of Black Cardiologists Women's Center), arms African-American women with the information they need to take action to decrease their risk of developing heart disease and stroke. This easy-to-read, important guide will teach readers everything they need to know about how their heart works, what makes it work well and what happens when it doesn't work as well as it should. Heart attack and stroke risk, heart disease prevention and management, and how to negotiate the healthcare system are also covered.

"The African American Woman's Guide to a Healthy Heart" will also teach readers about other topics, such as:

  • How heart and blood vessels work
  • The correlation between heart disease and stroke
  • The roles that high-blood pressure, obesity, tobacco and diabetes play in the development of these diseases
  • How to recover and to improve your health if you've already had heart disease or stroke; and how to prevent subsequent occurrences
  • How to help your family—especially physically inactive children-- live a heart-healthy life

Finally, a comprehensive list of resources aimed at helping readers find additional information to take charge of their health is also included. With the encouragement and knowledge gained from this definitive guide, African American women will be ready to make the important lifestyle changes they need to live a heart-healthy life.

Anne L. Taylor, M.D. is a Professor of Medicine and the Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is also the Director of the Association of Black Cardiologists' Women's Center. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The Association of Black Cardiologists is dedicated to reducing cardiovascular disease in the African American community. The association is centered in Atlanta, Georgia.

For more information about heart disease prevention and treatment, read "The African American Woman's Guide to a Healthy Heart"

(Edited by Anne L. Taylor, M.D. for the Association of Black Cardiologists Women Center, Hilton Publishing, ISBN: 0-9716067-6-5).

Contact:

Tara Brown

704-841-0709

tarabrown@hiltonpub.com

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