Is Human Cloning Really A New Biomedical Breakthrough?

Human cloning in the laboratory is inevitable and will bring with it disastrous consequences, according to Matthew Omaye Ajiake, author of Nephilim: The First Human Clones. Ajiake makes a case for the existence of human clones in Old Testament times in the form of the Nephilim, descendants of Cain, one of the sons of Adam. The Nephilim were referred to as “giants” and “the fallen ones” – unnatural and grotesque creatures.

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(PRWEB) July 7, 2005

In 1996, Dolly the sheep became the first surviving mammal known to be conceived by laboratory cloning. Other animals since Dolly, including horses and cattle, have been created using this method. The biotechnology used to create a human clone is essentially the same as that used to clone animals.

Human cloning in the laboratory is inevitable and will bring with it disastrous consequences, according to Matthew Omaye Ajiake, author of Nephilim: The First Human Clones.

Ajiake makes a case for the existence of human clones in Old Testament times in the form of the Nephilim, descendants of Cain, one of the sons of Adam. The Nephilim were referred to as “giants” and “the fallen ones” – unnatural and grotesque creatures.

Because Cain had murdered his brother Abel, Cain and his descendants were cursed by God and destined to become extinct after seven generations, according to biblical passages cited by Ajiake.

He writes that Lamech, a sixth-generation descendant of Cain, tried to escape this annihilation by creating clones of himself through a process that involved women from the lineage of Seth, another son of Adam. Son of Man.

Ajiake contends that the Nephilim were the first nihilists, having no respect for traditional values and beliefs, seeing existence as senseless and God as irrelevant. This attitude, also adopted by most other people of the era, brought about God’s appeal for humankind to repent.

God selected Noah to be the messenger of His call for repentance, and to build an ark as protection against a great flood that was to come if humanity failed to change its ways. No one heeded the warning call, and all humans except Noah and his family were destroyed by the flood.

Ajaike’s central message is that the world today is parallel to that of Noah’s time and that by ignoring God’s principles, humanity will bring destruction on itself.

He quotes Jesus saying, “As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man (the Second Coming of Christ).”

Part of the great evil of our time, Ajiake believes, is seen in attempts to create and manipulate life through the cloning process.

Proof that cloning is a perversion of nature and God’s purpose can be seen in the fact that the majority of cloned animals never survive, and that those who do are often oversized and demonstrate other physical anomalies, Ajiake says. He uses internationally respected authorities on cloning to support his argument.

“The greatest challenge in dealing with human cloning will come when we see an assortment of cloned humans and other creatures – from designer pets to designer babies to obscene hybrids,” Ajiake writes. “The process of human cloning has the potential to result in more loss of life than any catastrophic event modern mankind has ever experienced.”

For a review copy of the book or to set up an interview with Matthew Ajiake for a story, please contact Jay Wilke at 727-443-7115, ext. 223.

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