Workplace Violence Expert W.Barry Nixon Comes to Aid of Beleaguered Health Care Workers

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Nixon Offers Security Tips: Seven Things Every Health Care Worker Needs to Know About Workplace Violence.

From 1996 to 2000, 69 health care workers were killed on the job and among all American workers, health care and social services have the highest rates of non-fatal assault injuries in the workplace. According to a recent study by the American Nursing Association (ANA), nearly a half million nurses per year reported that they were victims of violent crimes in the workplace. With this in mind, preeminent workplace violence expert, W. Barry Nixon, SPHR, Executive Director, National Institute for the Prevention of Workplace Violence, Inc., has released a list of 7 things every health care worker needs to know about workplace violence.

“Every individual has a right to a safe workplace. My goal is to provide a quick set of easily assimilated tips anyone can use. While every Healthcare Worker should accept the fact that, given the increasing statistics, the chance of being exposed to Workplace Violence is very real; Healthcare Workers should also adapt and completely accept the paradigm that ‘violence is not a part of the job.’ Refuse to accept that becoming a victim is inevitable because most incidents of workplace violence are preventable if the organization and employees take the necessary steps to prevent it,” commented Nixon.

According to Nixon, there are 7 things every health care worker needs to know about Workplace Violence:

1.    Adapt and completely accept the paradigm that ‘violence is not a part of the job.’ Also, given recent statistics, accept the fact that the chance of you being exposed to workplace violence is very real. Refuse to accept that becoming a victim is inevitable because most incidents of workplace violence are preventable if your organization and employees take the necessary steps to prevent it.

(see NIX Model for Managing Workplace Violence at http://www.Workplaceviolence911.com

2.    Read your organizations workplace violence prevention policy and understand the definition of workplace violence and its components. (See Model Policies and definitions at http://www.Workplaceviolence911.com).

3.    Make a commitment to know, understand and recognize the potential warning signs or ‘at risk’ behaviors that individuals frequently demonstrate prior to an incident of workplace violence.

4.    Make a commitment to get training in workplace violence prevention. Request that your Union and/or Employer offers a program and if this does not happen, seek out information from the Human Resources, Security, Occupational Health & Safety departments; a professional association, e.g., ANA, AAOHN, ASIS, SHRM, etc.; from the internet; (http://www.Workplaceviolence911.com), or read a book on the subject.

5.    Take responsibility for your own safety and security at work. Report any and all concerns to the designated company representative, such as an Occupational Health and Safety professional, Human Resource or security manager. Don’t let peer pressure, a code of silence, belief that management will not take action or anything else prevent you from taking steps to protect yourself. If you recognize that a colleague, patients or visitors is exhibiting ‘at risk’ behavior, report it.

6.    As an employee, report any concerns about unsafe work conditions, breaches of your security policies or environmental or organizational conditions that may contribute to workplace violence to your human resources representative, security or occupational health professional.

7.    If your organization has a process for identifying high-risk patients and flagging charts or records of patients with a history of violence, make sure you understand it and take precautionary steps to protect yourself. Never dismiss these processes as unnecessary or not applicable (based on your experience with the person.) If your organization does not have a process, work with Human Resources, Security, or Occupational Health & Safety professionals to develop one.

Nixon offers these final words of advice; ”while it is certainly an organization’s responsibility to provide a safe work environment for its employees, remember that it is your life that may be at stake; don’t leave any stone unturned and do all you can to protect yourself.”

Mr. Nixon is certified in Security, Anger Management and Trauma Response. He is a recognized expert and regularly speaks at industry conferences such as ASIS International, Employment Management Association, SHRM, etc. He has authored many published articles and is regularly interviewed by radio and TV news shows as a workplace violence expert, both domestic and international.

Mr. Nixon is also creator of the award winning web site http://www.workplaceviolence911.com, the Ultimate Workplace Violence Prevention Policy Maker Software and http://www.PreemploymentDirectory.com, the most comprehensive source of background screening firms available on the Internet.

Complete details and a full review of workplace violence issues can be found at http://www.workplaceviolence911.com. Or by calling W. Barry Nixon at 949-770-5264.

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Sara Callahan
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