A Fayetteville Case of Animal Cruelty Illustrates the Harsh Realities of Puppy Mills

Share Article

Earlier this month, an abandoned pug was discovered in a parking lot in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The pug, later named Â?BunnyÂ? by the Pug Rescue of North Carolina, was found with her vulva sewn shut.

Earlier this month, an abandoned pug was discovered in a parking lot in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The pug, later named “Bunny” by the Pug Rescue of North Carolina, was found with her vulva sewn shut.

Veterinarian Dr. Jim Watson feels that Bunny had been bred many times, and it is suspected that she may have been part of a puppy mill.

According to the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), “puppy mills are breeding facilities that produce purebred puppies in large numbers. The puppies are sold either directly to the public via the Internet, newspaper ads, at the mill itself, or are sold to brokers and pet shops across the country.” Breeding dogs in puppy mills are bred over and over, and often discarded when they can no longer produce litters.

In Bunny’s case, it appears as though that’s exactly what has happened. After vets examined her, it was determined that she suffered from an inverted bladder, prolapsed uterus, a large cyst on her urethra, severe mastitis (infected breasts), a hernia in her diaphragm and extensive infection, and she tested positive for heartworm.

Pet-Abuse.Com, an organization that tracks cases of animal cruelty within the United States and other countries, shows at least 26 puppy mill cases reported so far this year in the US. In these cases, seizures range between 10 animals to over 300 animals, totaling more than 2,300 dogs removed from deplorable mill conditions just this year.

According to Chris Hedrick, president of Pug Rescue of North Carolina, Bunny was bred until her uterus literally fell out. Hedrick suspects that the reason for sewing the pug’s uterus shut was to allow the dog to carry one final litter to term.

Bunny has the number 62 tattooed in her left ear, a fact that may help authorities in discovering more about where she comes from.

Bunny has undergone surgery and is improving, but she still has many more surgeries ahead of her. If you wish to donate to help with Bunny’s medical treatment, contact the Pug Rescue of North Carolina at (336) 312-2983 or online at http://www.pugrescuenc.org.

There are no leads in this case, but a reward fund is being established. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Fayetteville Department of Animal Control at 321-6851.

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Alison Gianotto
Visit website