Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 Includes Incentives to Develop and Manufacture Advanced Diesel Vehicles

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The Energy Bill, signed into law by President George W. Bush on Aug 8, calls for grants to automobile manufacturers to encourage domestic production of efficient hybrid and advanced diesel vehicles. Early, the president called for tax incentives to encourage diesel auto sales. Diesels cut fuel consumption and offer clean air benefits that keep improving through efforts by technology companies such as Rypos Inc. of Medway MA. In Europe, with notoriously high gasoline prices, one of every three new cars is diesel powered. On Aug 21-25, European carmakers will introduce American engineers to their latest diesel vehicles at the US Department of Energy's (US DOE) Diesel Engine Emission Reduction (DEER) Conference in Chicago.

Expanding the market for diesel engines to include autos will further encourage development of even more efficient, environmentally friendly diesel power for passenger vehicles as well as stationary generators, construction equipment, ships and trains

The 2005 Energy Bill, signed into law on August 8 by President George W. Bush, calls for grants to auto manufacturers to encourage development and production of "efficient hybrid and advanced diesel vehicles." The new legislation fuels profit potential for companies developing clean diesel technology. Among them is Rypos, Inc. of Medway, MA, developer of an advanced diesel emission filter for a range of applications.

Earlier President Bush called for tax credits to spark diesel passenger car sales. The President told business leaders at the spring National Small Business Conference in Washington, "We're encouraging automakers to produce a new generation of modern, clean diesel cars and trucks…. Clean diesel technology will allow consumers to travel much farther on each gallon of fuel, without the smoke and pollution of past diesel engines. We've proposed $2.5 billion over 10 years in tax credits that will encourage consumers to buy energy-efficient hybrid cars and trucks, and we need to expand these incentives to include clean diesel vehicles, as well."

The full text of the President’s remarks are at http://www.rypos.com/tax/dieseltaxcredits.

In Europe, where gasoline sells for over twice US prices, one in every three new cars is a diesel. European car buyers like diesel for both fuel efficiency and pep. On Aug 21-25, European carmakers will introduce American engineers to their latest diesel vehicles at the US Department of Energy Diesel Engine Emission Reduction (DEER) Conference in Chicago.

"Expanding the market for diesel engines to include autos will further encourage development of even more efficient, environmentally friendly diesel power for passenger vehicles as well as stationary generators, construction equipment, ships and trains," says Frank DePetrillo, General Manager of Rypos, Inc. Rypos’s automated diesel filter is being tested for applications that include mining, marine transport and standby ground power.

DePetrillo makes a case for both diesel and diesel-electric hybrids, "Diesel is a ubiquitous, proven technology that gets more power from a gallon of fuel and emits fewer greenhouse gases. Diesel engines are durable and easy to maintain. With today’s electronic controls, they are quieter, cleaner and more fuel-efficient and powerful than those introduced in the US during the 1970s gas crisis. Looking to the future, diesel-electric hybrid autos will be even more fuel efficient and cleaner than their gasoline powered counterparts."

DePetrillo adds, "in third-world nations, however, diesel engines make more sense than hybrids that require sophisticated maintenance and costly batteries that eventually have to be replaced. Mechanics everywhere can keep diesel engines running efficiently with minimal emissions -- not so with hybrids."

Rypos (http://www.rypos.com) developed and markets the Rypos DPF™, a proprietary "active" or self-cleaning filter that eliminates up to 90-percent of soot from diesel emissions with greater reliability and less power loss than typically ceramic filters now in use. US-EPA and California-EPA regulations, together with voluntary compliance incentives, are driving demand for clean-diesel technology among engine makers such as Cummins, Detroit Diesel and Caterpillar. Many existing engines must be retrofit to comply with new regulations.

HOW THE ACTIVE FILTER WORKS. The Rypos DPF™ is made of porous sintered metal mesh to trap soot. The mesh looks like compressed steel wool and acts like a resistance heater. Electrical current, generated by the engine, passes through the mesh to heat it and periodically burn off soot. Automated circuitry monitors the process by measuring backpressure and cleans the filter as needed. The Rypos DPF™ removes up to 90-percent of soot while using one percent of engine output. It works in concert with catalytic converters that virtually eliminate nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide emissions and replaces the muffler as well.

Most diesel emission filters today are made of less-porous ceramic material. These filters need high exhaust temperatures to keep them clean, which is not always possible in cold climates or with engines that run intermittently. Other systems spray ignited fuel on the filter to burn off soot.

Rypos is soon expected to meet the requirements for California Air Resources Board Certification and the mining industry is evaluating the Rypos DPF™ for underground equipment.

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