Are New Age Novels Serious Literature?

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Should New Age novels be treated as serious works of literature? Â?The Weight Of LightÂ?, a spiritual and literary novel by English author Andrew Staniland, raises this question again.

Should New Age novels be treated as serious works of literature? “The Weight Of Light,” a spiritual and literary novel by English author Andrew Staniland, raises this question again.

“New Age” is possibly misleading. The catch-all phrase is “Mind, Body, Spirit.” And in the online bookstores, the sub-category in Fiction is “Visionary & Metaphysical”. However we label them, though, even the most successful spiritual novels, such as Paulo Coelho’s “The Alchemist” or James Redfield’s “The Celestine Prophecy,” are not regarded as serious literary fiction. Their writing style is genre fiction. Their message is more important than their medium.

“The Weight Of Light” describes the spiritual practice and spiritual experiences of Delphine, a Frenchwoman living in London. Its style is highly literary, almost a prose-poem. As the author says, “I have been writing for over 20 years and I write a lot of poetry, so the language is very important to me. Also, I’m not a teacher. My book isn’t promoting a particular teaching. It’s simply an honest description of a contemporary spiritual life.”

In fact, there is a great tradition of spiritual fiction in Western literature. Whether we think of Hermann Hesse’s “Siddhartha,” Blake’s prophetic books, the Romantic poetry of Shelley and Yeats, Goethe’s “Faust” or Dante’s “Divine Comedy,” no one would confine them to a non-serious sub-category. The question is which contemporary writers will join them?

“The Weight Of Light” is available at online and other bookstores.

The author’s website is http://www.andrewstaniland.co.uk.

Contact:

Andrew Staniland

00-44-20-7704-1036

info@andrewstaniland.co.uk

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