NFLPA, Charlie Taylor Stalemate Single Mom Suffers

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ItÂ?s been over 18 months now, and David is still fighting Goliath. Following a story released March 8, 2005 (Â?NFLPA Ordered to Mediate with Single MomÂ? PRWEB) a Houston businesswoman continues her battle to collect monies owed for the BET/NFLPA Super Bowl party at the Pavilion, Galleria in Houston last year.

It’s been over 18 months now, and David is still fighting Goliath. Following a story released March 8, 2005 (“NFLPA Ordered to Mediate with Single Mom” PRWEB) a Houston businesswoman continues her battle to collect monies owed for the BET/NFLPA Super Bowl party at the Pavilion, Galleria in Houston last year. The woman filed a civil complaint against the NFL Players Association and Taylor -- Cause No. 819789, Harris County Court No. 1, after which the judge ordered a mediation proceeding. Charles Taylor Jr. failed to appear, and the NFLPA waived discussions to reach a settlement. In a recent deposition, Taylor admits owing the money, but he and the NFLPA have yet to cooperate in a settlement.

While the City of Houston positions for another Super Bowl, a dark cloud of double-dealing and fraud still hangs over the city. Prior to Super Bowl 2004, Taylor represented the now defunct NFLPA – Houston Chapter as Vice President, and used the name to contract the local woman to plan and produce the highly successful BET/NFPA party at the Galleria Pavilion. No one can deny the hoopla, the NFL greats, the entertainment, food and the spirits made for a tremendous event at the upscale facility that attracted over 8,500 guests in one evening. But when the party was over, the money magically disappeared. The Houston businesswoman, and other vendors, were hung out to dry. Indeed, the NFLPA and other Super Bowl sponsors, including the hosting city have a duty to control the feeding frenzy, the get-rich-quick schemes, and to protect innocent locals who fall prey.

The NFLPA claims Taylor acted without authority, and cannot be held responsible for Taylor's actions as an individual. Curiously, the NFLPA has yet to file charges against Taylor. While Taylor and the NFLPA are at odds, the single mom of two children is left on the sidelines. She continues to fight the fight, struggling to survive the debacle that cost her over $31,000 when the NFLPA checks written by Taylor bounced.

It's not as if Taylor and the NFLPA can't afford to pay her--they simply have done nothing to resolve the matter. The NFLPA, a union organization and a member of the AFL-CIO, represents 1,800 active and 3,000 retired NFL players. The NFLPA, and its marketing and licensing subsidiary, "Players Inc." reportedly had an income of $165.1 million in 2004. Primarily, the NFLPA negotiates and assures the terms of the NFL's bargaining agreement for active players, and is a support organization for retired players like Taylor.

If the NFL, the NFLPA and the City of Houston truly want to clean up their image, they should be required to exercise more control over the programming and management of the wide-reaching Super Bowl event. Besides fraud as in this case, we do not need “accidental” vulgarities televised, price-gouging and the list goes on. Why not re-invent the “Super Bowl”? Make it what it was intended to be—what it used to be—the annual apex of the sport of professional football. Unfortunately, for many folks like the single mom who are damaged by the event, it must feel like a very bad hangover.

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Lou Gaglio

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