New Hope for Adults with Bipolar-ADHD Syndrome

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A Denver psychiatrist has found in long-term clinical studies that many adults with bipolar disorders can achieve a remarkable, stable recovery by taking stimulant medications along with conventional mood stabilizers. They are suffering from an inherited syndrome of childhood-onset bipolar disorder with ADHD and do not respond fully to conventional bipolar treatment. Dr. William Niederhut has published his findings in a new book, "The COBAD Syndrome: New Hope for People Suffering from the Inherited Syndrome of Childhood-Onset Bipolar Disorder with ADHD."

A Denver psychiatrist has found in long-term clinical studies that many adults with bipolar disorders can achieve a remarkable, stable recovery by taking stimulant medications like Ritalin or amphetamines along with conventional mood stabilizers. "They are suffering from an inherited bipolar syndrome with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and do not respond fully to conventional approaches to bipolar treatment," he said.

"These people and their biological relatives typically experience chronic depression, irritability and anxiety beginning in their childhood years, along with symptoms of ADHD," said Dr. William Niederhut, a graduate of Harvard Medical School. "The ADHD is an integral part of their childhood-onset bipolar syndrome. It is not a case of their having either a bipolar disorder or ADHD, but both."

Researchers at Harvard first identified the syndrome in children a decade ago, but "psychiatrists studying bipolar disorders have been slow to recognize and successfully treat the syndrome in adults," said Dr. Niederhut. "Their studies have tended to focus on hospitalized adults with more severe bipolar disorders who are not candidates for stimulant treatment."

Dr. Niederhut became interested in the Harvard research literature on children with the syndrome two years ago after both of his daughters were diagnosed with childhood bipolar disorders. He then recognized a mild form of the syndrome in himself, and began to identify its features in many of his adult patients.

"I found that the syndrome is quite common, and can be successfully treated, often with excellent results," he said. "Many of my patients feel well now for the first time in their lives, without symptoms of depression, ADHD, or mania."

For the past two years Dr. Niederhut has been carefully refining his approach to diagnosing and treating the syndrome, which he has called the "COBAD" syndrome, an acronym for "Childhood-Onset Bipolar Attention-Deficit" syndrome. He has published his findings, together with a summary of the research literature on the subject, in his new book, "The COBAD Syndrome: New Hope for People Suffering from the Inherited Syndrome of Childhood-Onset Bipolar Disorder with ADHD," available this month at Amazon.com

"My book calls for a paradigm shift in modern psychiatry," he said. "Psychiatrists need to do more than simply stabilize moods for people with this syndrome. They need to recognize and treat the ADHD that is an integral, disabling part of the disorder."

Contact Info:

William Niederhut, M.D.

650 South Cherry Street, Suite 1060

Denver, Colorado 80246

Phone: (303) 331-0662 / Fax: (303) 377-3849

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