MRT 'Goes To The Dogs' and Successfully Demonstrates Non-Invasive Control of Heart Rate, Rhythm and Conduction

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Foundation for Jacobson Resonance (FJR) -- There always has been a unique relationship between man and dog. But now that relationship may well be “shifting” as our canine friends point the way for people to utilize Magnetic Resonance Therapy (MRT) to relax and calm our systems. That's the word coming from scientists at the Cardiac Arrhythmia Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. It appears that those dogs hearts, in studies at Oklahoma, “aren't skipping a beat”, because MRT has demonstrated a non-invasive control of their heart rate, rhythm and conduction. These encouraging results hold great promise for all of us.

solely to enhance feelings of relaxation.

Foundation for Jacobson Resonance (FJR) – There always has been a unique relationship between man and dog. But now that relationship may well be "shifting" as our canine friends point the way for people to utilize Magnetic Resonance Therapy (MRT) to relax and calm our systems. That's the word coming from scientists at the Cardiac Arrhythmia Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. It appears that those dogs hearts, in studies at Oklahoma, "aren't skipping a beat," because MRT has demonstrated a non-invasive control of their heart rate, rhythm and conduction. These encouraging results hold great promise for all of us.

Dogs make valuable contributions in biomedical research because they share many biochemical and physiologic characteristics with humans, and spontaneously develop disorders that are very much like pathologic conditions in humans. Dogs are widely used in cardiovascular research, not only by academic scientists studying the structure and function of the heart and blood vessels, but also pharmaceutical companies testing in drugs.

Early in 1999 basic science cardio-electromagnetic studies in dog models were initiated at the University of Oklahoma utilizing the Jacobson Resonator (MRT), and are ongoing. Principal Investigator, Professor Benjamin Scherlag has stated:

"Calculated values of low-level electromagnetic fields applied to the heart or to the vagosympathetic nerves innervating the heart induce significant alterations of heart rate and aria-ventricular (A-V) conduction associated with human autonomic effects on these cardiac properties. Although the electromagnetic field applications are relatively brief, 5-35 minutes, the effects persist for hours before showing a return towards control levels. The ability to alter heart rate, AV conduction, and heart rhythm would find many clinical uses, including slowing ventricular responses in patients with atrial fibrillation, (rapid irregular twitching of the muscular wall) when drug therapy is unsuccessful; and suppression of atrial fibrillation that would ordinarily be treated by cardioversion (restoration of heart rhythm to normal by electrical countershock or by chemicals)." (As published in the Journal, Cardiology in Review, "Magnetism and Cardiac Arrhythmias," March/April 2004; 12(2):85-96. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; see attachment for more detailed report).

We make note of the fact that atrial fibrillation can cause stroke, which is one of the most common causes of neurological disabilities in Western countries.

And now – how about the "human side"... A couple of years ago Deborah Hennessy, RN, 50, of Lake Worth, Florida was going through an extremely stressful period in her life. Suddenly, based on 20+ years of medical experience, Ms. Hennessy realized that she had developed an irregular heartbeat and accelerated heart rate. Aware of MRT, and after only two sessions in the MRT relaxation protocol, her heartbeat and heart rate have been normal.

Ms. Hennessy offers: "Life was stressful enough already, but when I had sudden onset of irregular heartbeat, and my heart rate sped-up, it was frightening. After my first MRT session there was significant improvement, and, after the second session the problem disappeared and never returned. I was relieved, profoundly relaxed, slept better, and remain grateful for MRT to this day." Several other patients, in ongoing clinical case studies, have shown similar improvements with treatment and maintenance programs.

Dr. Jacobson concludes, "Considering the various basic science and clinical studies that have been conducted throughout the world, it appears that utilization of very weak extremely low frequency, physiologic magnetic fields represents a non-invasive, painless and remarkably safe approach to medical therapeutics, and should be thoroughly studied to assure safety and efficacy; and to fulfill a vast and untapped potential for ameliorating human suffering."

For further information please contact Harvey Grossman, Founder & President of the Foundation for Jacobson Resonance at 1.877.439.0514 in North America, and at 561.208.1775 from outside North America. For charitable contributions only, call 561.208.1775.

On February 17, 2004 Section 513(g) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (Act), Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDR1-1)indicated it does not intend to enforce pre-market requirements on the Jacobson Resonator. This enforcement discretion applies to this type of device only when it is labeled "solely to enhance feelings of relaxation."

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Harvey Grossman
Foundation for Jacobson Resonance
561-208-1775
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