Music Lessons Can Improve Children's Performance in School

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Music lessons have been shown to improve children's performance in school. After eight months of keyboard lessons, preschoolers tested showed a 46% boost in their spatial IQ, which is crucial for higher brain functions such as complex mathematics. Frances Rauschrer, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine.

The North Shore Women's Journal, http://www.nswj.com October issue reports: The speed at which one learns something is different for different people. Lessons for your child helps increase the speed at which he learns. You're a parent, trying to help your child become a better student in school. Music will increase the speed at which your child can solve problems because learning how to play an instrument makes your child think and helps them to be more coordinated. While learning an instrument, your child uses the same abstract reasoning skills that he uses in mathematics.

"I remember as a child in grade school, playing London Bridge with my classmates as our music teacher played the piano and sang with us." Said Bob Wolfman founder of Wolfman School of Music and online guitar lessons at, http://www.wolfmans.com. "The timing of our movements, joining hands, walking under raised arms, turning, then falling down, and then starting up again was all in cadence with the music." "It was all about the music. Tempo, rhythm, form and structure determined our movements, and we learned to sing the melody accentuating the "All Fall Down!" part, of course."

Through music children can connect their outer environment (the world of movement and sound) with the inner world of feelings and observations. Playing games or moving to music is a powerful first experience in the artistic process. Children learn music the same way they learn language--by listening and imitating. It's this process of listening and imitating that promotes a child's ability to express and articulate thoughts and perceptions.

Learning to play an instrument involves the use of both hands, in which finger play definitely promotes language development, fine-motor skills, and coordination, as well as self-esteem. Young children feel proud when they sing a song and can do the accompanying finger movements. It's always very gratifying for me to see a huge smile come over a child's face when he or she is able to play a melody or phrase they didn't think they could get. Then Voila! The child realizes "Hey, I did it once, so I can do it again!"

Listening to music also teaches important prereading skills. When children learn to strum on the guitar, or play their first chords on the piano, they can play the rhythmic pattern of words. They learn to differentiate between a fast and slow tempo, changes in volume with the music getting louder or softer, and instruments played one at a time and together, etc. When they try new instruments, they notice how each new sound changes the music.

Students of music and other arts continue to outperform their non-arts peers on the SAT, according to reports by the College Entrance Examination Board. As a whole, in 1995, SAT-takers with experience in music . . . scored 51 points higher on the verbal portion of the test, and 39 points higher on the math portion, as compared to students with no experience. And longer arts study means higher SAT scores: in 1990, those who had studied the arts four or more years scored 59 points higher on the verbal and 44 points higher in the math portion, than students with no experience in the arts.

Music lessons have been shown to improve children's performance in school. After eight months of keyboard lessons, preschoolers tested showed a 46% boost in their spatial IQ, which is crucial for higher brain functions such as complex mathematics. Frances Rauschrer, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine.

Wolfman School of Music offers private and group music lessons and also recently introduced an online Guitar course at http://www.wolfmans.com

Bob Wolfman was born and raised in New York City. He began playing guitar at age 11, performing at the age of 13. While in High School at age 15, Bob began doing pro recording studio work as a session player in Manhattan with some of the biggest names in the music industry. At 17 he began touring all over the world with many top name artists in the Rock, Blues and Jazz genres.

Bob has performed/recorded with such greats as keyboard genius Chick Corea, the founding father of Jazz/Fusion guitar, Larry Coryell, and sax legend Grover Washington.

Bob Wolfman has a degree in Performance from the esteemed Berklee College of Music with over two years in Music Education. He is also the founder of Wolfman's School Of Music, originally in Arlington, Massachussetts, one of the most respected and ubiquitous names in the Boston area for music instruction and he is the founder of the popular online Guitar course offered at http://www.wolfmans.com.

Wolfman school of music offers the very best in high quality music instruction with private and group instruction for guitar and bass, and private lessons for drums and keyboard. For questions contact Bob Wolfman at 978-887-0216 or visit him

On the web: http://www.wolfmans.com

To learn more about this and also read other interesting articles go to http://www.nswj.com.

The Women’s Journal Newspapers (http://www.nswj.com) are rated the #1 Educational Newspaper in the United States. The Women’s Journal seeks to educate readers as well as provide objective opinions. Each of our national, award-winning Women’s Newspapers™ is an informative, objective and educational local resource for the community. Published six times a year, both in print and online, The North Shore Women's Journal and NSWJ.com, serves readers with the professional best in local businesses by providing valued information in a wide variety of special columns and features.

Smart news for women, http://www.nswj.com.

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Diane Marsh
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