Pregnant Mothers Choose Giving Birth in Silence --Prenatal Experience Can Influence Babies

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While almost everyone knows that drug and alcohol abuse influence the health of the unborn, millions of people today also understand that spoken words can affect the intelligence and happiness of babies still in the womb. But why should pregnant women choose to give birth in silence?

While almost everyone knows that drug and alcohol abuse influence the health of the unborn, millions of people today also understand that spoken words can affect the intelligence and happiness of babies still in the womb. And due to media buzz surrounding Hollywood celebrities subscribing to "silent birth" this message is getting out to millions more. But why should pregnant women choose to give birth in silence?

The connection between prenatal experience and later life difficulties suffered by children was first clearly explained in 1950 in the best-selling book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health by L. Ron Hubbard. The book Dianetics (http://www.dianetics.org) has sold over 20 million copies and its methods have been tried and tested around the world. Hubbard explained that when an unborn child is bumped, knocked, squeezed - in short injured - in the womb and/or when the mother is giving birth, everything said by the mother or others in the vicinity is recorded below the awareness of the child in what Hubbard termed the child's "reactive mind."

Under certain circumstances the content of those recordings can be activated later in life and make a person act irrationally or otherwise limit his abilities and intelligence, explains Hubbard. Yet the person has no idea what is making him act or feel that way. Anyone could have such prenatal experiences - all of them potentially harmful when coupled with language, such as "he doesn’t want to come out," stated by a well-meaning doctor or nurse to a colleague.

The primary rule is silence when giving birth, according to Brittany Wadhams, who recently gave birth to her first son, Jack.

"I was as quiet as I could be and so were the doctor and assistants. My parents were present during the birth, and they were silent too. We wanted to do that for my baby," says Wadhams.

Hubbard goes further in regards to how pregnant women should be treated. “A woman who is pregnant should be given every consideration by a society which has any feeling for its future generations. If she falls, she should be helped-but silently.” And he adds, “The mother, then, should be extremely gentle on herself during pregnancy and those around her should be entirely informed of the necessity for silence after any jar or injury.”

As for the act of birth itself, he cautions, “A woman who wants her child to have the best possible chance will insist upon silence being maintained in the hospital delivery room as far as it is humanly possible.”

Since these discoveries were first announced by Hubbard in 1950, they have been applied by doctors and nurses around the world. After a six-year international investigation of research from America, Canada, England, France, Sweden, Germany, Austria, New Zealand and Switzerland, Thomas Verny, M.D. wrote, "...the unborn child is a feeling, remembering, aware being, and because he is, what happens to him-what happens to any of us-in the nine months between conception and birth molds and shapes personality, and drives ambitions in very important ways."

Conclusion - silence is indeed golden for women giving birth.

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Barb Dakin
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