Heavy Demand for Intelligent Design and Science Wars Articles Prompts SciPolicy Journal to Give Free and Open Access to Archives

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SciPolicy -- The Journal of Science and Health Policy -- announced today that, as a public service, all of its articles are now free and open access on-line. The move is prompted by a recent ten-fold increase in demands on its already busy website (http://scipolicy.net) for articles related to its Amicus Currie filing in Federal Court (Kitzmiller, et al v Dover Area School District and school Board) opposing government mandates to teach of intelligent design in public schools and the Science Wars controversies.

SciPolicy -- The Journal of Science and Health Policy -- announced today that all of its articles are now free and open access on-line.

The public service move is prompted by a recent ten-fold increase in demands on its already busy website (http://scipolicy.net) for articles related to its Amicus Curiae brief in Federal Court (the case of Kitzmiller, et al v Dover Area School District and Dover Area School District Board of Directors) and for its editorial opposing government mandates to teach of intelligent design in public schools, and its numerous articles on the Science Wars.

According to Stephen Miles Sacks, PhD, SciPolicy editor and publisher, “Several of Scipolicy’s Editorial Board members are leading scholarly authors who are protagonists and antagonists, in the Science Wars and Intelligent Design controversies. SciPolicy published an important core of 20 related scholarly articles on the on-going Science Wars conflict between physical scientists and Social Studies of Science authors over methods of science. Some of the authors include Norman Levitt, Paul R. Gross, Steve Fuller, Val Dusek, Gabriel Stolzenberg, and Angèle Kremer Marietti. The full index and abstracts of articles are available at http://scipolicy.net.

In dual action on November 7, 2005, SciPolicy, filed its brief for Amicus Curiae in Federal Court and it also issued the editorial: “Government Should Not Mandate Teaching Intelligent Design As An Alternative To Evolution.” The editorial and court brief are available for review on SciPolicy ‘s website: http://scipolicy.net. The Court is expected to issue a ruling in the case in the next few weeks.

SciPolicy Journal™ of Haverford, Pennsylvania on Philadelphia’s Main Line, is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal. Its articles include topics on outcomes research in health care and mental health, science policy, industrial policy, and evaluation of research centers. It has issued editorials on the intelligent design controversy, government mandates for peer review, and the state of the National Academies (of Science). It is one of only two journals of science and health policy in the world. Since its introduction in 2000, the Journal’s website (http://scipolicy.net) received over 80,000 visitors and millions of hits. Article and book proposals and manuscripts should be submitted by email to the editor.

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Stephen Miles Sacks, PhD
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