Why Art and Romance Mix

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One of the most romantic spots in New York is the Frick Collection, on Fifth Avenue and 70th St. In Boston, it’s the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum. In Los Angeles, it’s the Hammer. Savvy couples have discovered these spots, but they’re still a well-kept secret – one revealed by the author of an acclaimed new book about the art world.

One of the most romantic spots in New York is the Frick Collection, on Fifth Avenue and 70th St. In Boston, it’s the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum. In Los Angeles, it’s the Hammer. Savvy couples have discovered these spots, but they’re still a well-kept secret – one revealed by the author of an acclaimed new book about the art world.

“People can be intimidated by museums,” says novelist Robert J. Hughes, “but they’re actually great spots for breaking the ice, for first and second dates or let’s-try-something-new dates. They don’t take too much of a commitment, they’re often quite convenient to where you or your date work– and chances are neither of you has visited your local small museum in a while.

Here are some of Hughes’ suggestions for dating and art:

  • Do choose a local museum that has a small collection – they’re usually very easy to navigate, and you won’t feel too intimidated
  • Do check for late hours; sometimes museums also have cocktail opportunities and live music
  • Do concentrate on one or two galleries
  • Don’t be intimidated; think in terms of a few pieces of art
  • Do pay the suggested admission price – it’s cheaper than most movies and helps support the institution
  • Do rent the audio guides, so that you and your date can learn a little as you wander the gallery.
  • Do take a free tour if one is available – you might enjoy learning in a group – and you can always discuss your experience later
  • Do ask at the concierge or information desk about local restaurants if you’re unfamiliar with the area where the museum is located; many little bistros and cafes thrive near cultural institutions and you and your date can make an evening of it

Robert J. Hughes, a reporter for the Wall Street Journal, has written extensively about the art market. His new novel, “Late and Soon,” is set in the rarefied world of art auctions. He is available to speak with you on all aspects of the art world today, from auction houses to buying trends.

Contact:

Betsy Steve

646-437-1208

Betsy.Steve@avalonpub.com

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Betsy Steve

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