Satellite Radio -- A Product That Really Delivers

Share Article

Since the day Howard Stern announced his groundbreaking deal with Sirius Satellite Radio, hundreds of thousands of fans have eagerly signed up for the service. As Stern's 2006 launch nears, millions more are still hesitantly considering a jump to the new medium, but why are so many Stern fans still unsure of satellite radio? Maybe the answer lies in the anti-satellite propaganda campaign devised by "Terrestrial Radio" as it runs for cover.

Since the day Howard Stern announced his groundbreaking deal with Sirius Satellite Radio, hundreds of thousands of fans have eagerly signed up for the service. As Stern's 2006 launch nears, millions more are still hesitantly considering a jump to the new medium, but why are so many Stern fans still unsure of satellite radio? Maybe the answer lies in the anti-satellite propaganda campaign devised by "Terrestrial Radio" as it runs for cover.

According to one entrepreneur (and Howard Stern fan), satellite radio is a product that delivers in a "Big Way." Wayne Perry runs SiCap Industries, a natural health company made famous by their popular sinus and headache remedy known as “Sinus Buster.” As the world's first hot pepper nasal spray (http://www.sinusbuster.com), Sinus Buster has garnered its' fair share of publicity, but Perry credits Howard Stern with helping his company launch their product into the mainstream marketplace back in 2004. Today Perry is following Stern into the satellite business with a brand new venture.

“Millions of Stern fans want Sirius, but they’re scared by the anti-satellite hype. I thought about buying a satellite receiver for almost a year, but I was afraid to make the purchase. Not because of my faith in the content, but because of the technology itself. Being a Stern fan, I had no problem paying twelve bucks a month for the King Of All Media even if all the other channels sucked, but I was skeptical of the technology thanks to the negative propaganda coming from my local radio stations,” says Perry.

Perry researched various satellite receivers for several months, but was still unsure if the new technology was worth the price.

“I heard the horror stories about bad reception and unreliable equipment, but I finally settled on a receiver. My biggest concern was that it might work fine in my car, but not at my office or visa versa. Especially since we have minimal window space in our building. The last thing I wanted to do was hassle with installing the antenna outside. So I set the antenna on the windowsill and aimed it toward the sky. I activated the account online, and in seconds the service kicked in. I went into the receiver's menu and set the built in wireless FM transmitter to a desired signal (88.1 FM). Then I turned on a radio in the next room, and tuned it to 88.1 FM. Sure enough, it worked flawlessly and I’ve been listening to Sirius ever since. I can pick up the signal on every radio in our building and it sounds way better than the signals we get from most of our local stations,” says Perry.

Although Perry chose Sirius especially for Howard Stern, he admits the programming has something for everyone.

“The first station I turned to was Howard Stern’s channel 100. Even though Howard won’t be on until January, they’re already broadcasting and the content is compelling to say the least. Stern 100 News is a winner and I can’t wait until the man himself is on in January. But there’s a lot more than Stern on Sirius. I was blown away by the variety and quality of the programming. Until you actually listen to satellite radio, you can’t truly experience the depth of the concept. I went from Rap -- to Punk -- to Alternative -- to Canadian Hip Hop - to Comedy -- to Sports -- to Talk -- to a channel that plays nothing but the Rolling Stones 24/7. Within minutes of scanning the universe, I was positive this is the most innovative and promising communications medium since the internet. That’s why we’ve started a new company to promote and protect the business of satellite radio,” adds Perry.

Perry’s company, Intellectual Property Developers (IPD) is creating a new web porthole dedicated to satellite radio. IPD has purchased numerous web domains related to satellite radio including http://www.satradiozone.com and http://www.satradiopodcast.com. In late January, the company plans on launching Satradiozone to promote the latest on industry news, programming and equipment. IPD also plans on developing deals with satellite content distributors to feature promotional podcast snippets from select programming.

“It’s all about promotion. Here you have a great service, but because it’s so new, a lot of people are scared to make the jump. And for new subscribers, it’s a big unniverse out there, and listeners are going to need guidance as to what’s on and what’s worth listening to. As the industry grows, the shows and stations will be competing for listeners. If nobody knows a station exists, how can they listen? At Satradiozone people can sample shows, and read the latest about radio celebrities and programming. We’ll also be selling ad space to programmers, retailers and distributors. Ads are limited on satellite radio, but our website will give retailers avenues to reach that audience,” Perry explains.

IPD is also seeking journalists who’d like to write about the business of satellite radio. The company is accepting “solicited” material from freelancers covering every aspect of the industry.

“We’re looking for people to write regular columns about the satellite business. We need writers to critique the channels and content. We need writers to rate equipment and report on satellite news concerning the business and personalities. Most of our contributors are non-paid, but we do pay up to 100 dollars for certain articles. Of course as the industry grows, the compensation will grow too. We also trade out ad space with some contributors as compensation. It’s a chance for aspiring journalists to get in the door of an industry that will be as big as cable television in the near future.. Think of Satradiozone.com as satellite radio’s answer to the TV Guide,” boasts Perry.

To submit articles in synopsis form, and to find out more about business opportunities and sponsorships at Satradiozone.com, email Wayne Perry directly at (wayneperry@sicapindustries.com). Wayne Perry is also available for media interviews through the contact information provided with this release.

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Visit website