What Bagging the Elephant Means to a Small Company

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Imagine a company performing about the same amount of work as now, but making three times as much money. That can happen when a small company bags its elephant (big company).

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A small company's ability to adapt quickly to Elephants determines its success in bagging one. Just what will Bagging an Elephant mean to a small company? It's up to that company.

Imagine a company performing about the same amount of work as now, but making three times as much money. That can happen when a small company bags its Elephant (big company).

Now imagine that company behind on orders for the third month in row. See it throwing away money because it can't get the job done on time. Watch its reputation suffering. That can happen when a small company Bags its Elephant, too.

Is going after the big client worth the hassle?

Steve Kaplan, the popular author of the best-selling book Bag the Elephant!, said: “Nearly any small business can double or triple its earnings by bagging a large company as a client. But for some companies, hooking onto a really big company is the worst thing that will ever happen to them. They’re simply not ready.”

For most companies, like a certain real estate business, the acquisition of a large client is great news, even though it sometimes means radical change.

That real estate firm had negotiated an exclusive contract at a discounted rate to find housing relocation for the executives of a large company. The move forced their own firm to rapidly adapt to a new emphasis, and for them the substantial increase in income and stability from that contract more than made the change worthwhile.

A custom stationery company called Touching Memories bagged a corporate client that needed them to radically alter their available product. Instead of just letterhead and notepads, the big company they landed wanted calendars, something they had never done before. But they added calendars and captured that big customer permanently. The key to Touching Memories' success was in their willingness to change.

As Steve Kaplan said: “A small company's ability to adapt quickly to Elephants determines its success in bagging one. Just what will Bagging an Elephant mean to a small company? It's up to that company.”

You can learn more about Steve Kaplan’s principles of doing business with big clients (Elephants) at http://www.differencemaker.com/shop.asp?id=154.

CONTACT:

Michael Drew

850-747-8188

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