5 Christmas Tips for Children with ADHD

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Parents of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often cringe during the holidays. The expectation of presents and chaotic busyness can turn already energetic children into spinning tops. Celebrate! ADHD Founder Kirk Martin has developed a list of “5 Tips to Help Children with ADHD Enjoy Christmas."

Parents of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often cringe during the holidays. The expectation of presents and chaotic busyness can turn already energetic children into spinning tops.

Celebrate! ADHD Founder Kirk Martin has developed a list of “5 Tips to Help Children with ADHD Enjoy Christmas.”

“Most families self-destruct and miss out on the spirit of the season,” says Martin. “We think parents can make this the most special holiday season ever by working with their child’s nature, instead of against it.”

Martin recommends that parents take advantage of their child’s personality and learning style by following these five tips to enjoy a peaceful, meaningful Christmas.

1. Give your child less stuff and more time. More presents condition our kids to be unsettled and bored. Children with ADHD crave one-on-one time. So instead of buying more toys with short life-spans, create lasting memories by enjoying special experiences with your child.

2. Cultivate your child’s inner gifts, instead of focusing on buying gifts. The real treasure this Christmas should be found inside your child, not inside Best Buy. Confidence and a sense of purpose are built by reinforcing your child's natural gifts, talents and passions. Give presents that reinforce and develop your child’s gifts and talents—whether it is building (LEGOS), drawing (easel and pad) or being strategic (chess, board games).

3. Shower your child with praise, not presents. Our kids soak up positive reinforcement because they hear it so infrequently. Want to give a gift they will remember forever? Recognize and reward their positive qualities and catch them doing good things.

4. Make giving, not receiving, the centerpiece of your family’s traditions. Our kids have big, compassionate hearts and like to be part of something meaningful. So turn your family’s holiday efforts to the less fortunate.

5. Take a holiday from your stress and negativity. Spend the next few weeks building up your child. Say only positive statements. Reward progress, celebrate small wins.

Parents will be surprised how fun and meaningful the holiday season can be when they take advantage of their child’s creativity, gifts and talents and compassionate heart.

For more free tips to improve your child’s confidence, social skills and school performance, simply request the Celebrate! ADHD newsletter by visiting http://www.celebrateADHD.com.

Kirk Martin is Founder of Celebrate!ADHD, which provides in-home and phone consultations, workshops and educational materials for families affected by ADHD.

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