ADHD Medication: Ritalin Patch Will Break Down Barriers to Treatment

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The first medication patch for ADHD is approaching approval in the United States. This new preparation will make medication more accessible to children and thus break down barriers and improve treatment options for children with ADHD and their families.

The first skin patch to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children is approaching approval in the United States. A federal advisory panel has deemed it safe and effective, and it will go in front of the Food and Drug Administration on December 28, 2005.

The FDA generally accepts the recommendation of the advisory committees, but it is not required to do so.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, is a disorder which affects up to 7% of children. It affects all aspects of the child's life - academic, social, emotional and even physical. There can be many barriers to effective diagnosis and treatment. It is imperative to find many different treatments which will work for the affected individuals.

Medication for ADHD plays an important role for upwards of 60-80% of children with ADHD. Medication is ideally combined with psychological, behavioral and academic treatments for a comprehensive treatment strategy. Despite currently available medications being effective for most children, there are many children who just cannot swallow the pills.

"It is a shame when an effective ADHD medication cannot be taken because of an inability to swallow the pill," says Dr. Kenny Handelman, from http://www.TheADHDDoctor.com. "The availability of the Ritalin patch will make medication available for more children, thus breaking down barriers to treatment."

The Ritalin patch, to be marketed under the name Daytrana, is comprised of methylphenidate. The side effects of the patch are reported to include: decreased appetite, headaches, insomnia, nausea and tics. These are the same as the side effects which are possible with the oral form of the medication -- available in preparations such as Ritalin LA, Concerta, and Metadate CD.

"Despite the fact that excellent treatments are currently available for ADHD, continued innovation is always needed. The Ritalin patch is one such innovation which will be a great help to individuals and families who deal with ADHD daily. If this medication is not approved, it will be a great setback to ADHD patients," says Dr. Kenny Handelman. "We need to continually break down barriers for individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder."

Dr. Kenny Handelman is a Board Certified Psychiatrist and is President of Medical Integrity Inc. To learn more accurate and scientific information about ADD/ADHD, subscribe to his newsletter at http://www.TheADHDDoctor.com.

For interested media, please visit http://www.TheADHDDoctor.com/media

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Kenneth Handelman, MD
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