5 Things to do to Grow Younger in 2006

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Most Americans know that aging can be slowed by their choice of activities and eating habits, however, few of them are aware that they can actually reverse aging and grow biologically younger. They don’t know the five little things they can do to recapture the energy and vitality of their long-lost youth.

Most Americans know that aging can be slowed by their choice of activities and eating habits; however, few of them are aware that they can actually reverse aging and grow biologically younger. They don’t know the five little things they can do to recapture the energy and vitality of their long-lost youth.

According to author Ed Mayhew, “Countless men and women have turned back the hands of time, as proven by their age-defying feats of endurance, strength and speed past the age of 40.” In his latest book, "Fitter for Life: The Secrets 25 Masters of Fitness", Mayhew revealed the secrets to growing and staying younger of 25 of these amazing but regular folks. As a result of his research, Mayhew found that there are 5 things that can be done to grow younger in 2006. They are:

1. Believe in the possibility of growing younger. This can be accomplished by studying the Masters of Fitness -- those who have actually grown younger -- such as California’s Helen Klein. Klein went from being unable to jog a half mile at age 55 to running 3 standard 26.2-mile marathons in three days just shy of her eighty-second birthday.

2. Find an emotional trigger. Most Americans know what should be done for their well being, but few of them do it. That’s because logic doesn’t compel one to action – only strong emotion can do that. Sixty-year-old Pennsylvanian Jack Klein (no relation to Helen Klein) was an overweight (235 pounds) couch potato. When a similarly-overweight acquaintance, 6 months his junior, suddenly died of a massive coronary, this served as the emotional catalyst to get him to take action. Just one year later, Klein had lost 81 pounds and was enjoying a lithe, youthful 156-pound body.

3. Change the self image. A couple of years ago, Scott Hults saw himself as retired Navy and getting a little heavy and sluggish. Although he was 60 years old, he decided to change his self-image to that of a bodybuilder and garnered a “boatload” of trophies and accolades in the process. For competitions, he lowered his percentage of body fat to as low as 4% -- lower than basketball superstar Michael Jordan’s in his prime.

4. Eat to support the activity level. At 64, Margery Meyer had a cholesterol reading of 385 mg/dl and was feeling “old.” When, at the urging of her daughter, she decided to take up competitive swimming as a member of the US Masters Swimming program, she adjusted her diet so she could succeed. As a result, in 2005, now in her eighties, she earned her 50th World Record and had lowered her cholesterol to much healthier levels.

5. Improve exercise quality. More exercise is not necessarily the answer, but upping the quality is. Virginia’s Robert Gurtler ran 82 races of 3 miles or longer in 2004 at age 69. He accomplished this amazing feat of endurance with just two 3-mile training runs per week. The frequent racing supplied the “training” intensity he needed to outperform runners half his age.

These Masters of Fitness and many others show that not only can the aging process be slowed, but that it can be reversed, too. By doing just 5 little things differently, like they do, one can grow younger in 2006. To find out more about the Masters of Fitness and what they have to share on growing younger, visit http://www.fitterforlife.com

And for an engaging and passionate interview, contact Ed Mayhew, THE Expert on Growing Younger Naturally, at 540-662-8324 or edmayhew11@adelphia.net

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