Alliance for Healthy Homes and American Lung Association Provide the Truth About Radon

Share Article

Real estate agents can sometimes mislead (perhaps unintentionally) prospective homebuyers by downplaying the severity of indoor radon exposure or the likelihood that high radon levels could exist in a particular community.

These findings effectively end any doubts about the risks to Americans of having radon in their homes

Real estate agents can sometimes mislead (perhaps unintentionally) prospective homebuyers by downplaying the severity of indoor radon exposure or the likelihood that high radon levels could exist in a particular community.

As part of National Radon Action Month, the Alliance for Healthy Homes (AFHH) and the American Lung Association (ALA) have prepared a Radon Fact Sheet containing up-to-date information regarding radon risk:

1.Radon exposure is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers; radon causes lung cancer in smokers as well.

2.There has been more epidemiologic investigation exploring the association between radon (and its decay products) and lung cancer than any other environmental carcinogen. Experimental exposure in animals, occupational studies of radon-exposed miners, and direct observation from individuals exposed to radon in their homes provides a firm scientific foundation that documents radon is a major environmental carcinogen.

3.According to the Science Advisory Board, “radon inhalation is the largest source of collective radiation exposure (and presumably, radiation risk) to the U.S. population as a whole.”

4.Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Science Advisory Board increased their radon risk assessment by more than 50% and now estimate 21,000 Americans die of radon-induced lung cancer annually

5.The World Health Organization (WHO) says radon causes up to 15% of all lung cancers worldwide.

6.Although lung cancer can be treated, the survival rate is one of the lowest for those with cancer. From the time of diagnosis, only 11-15% of those afflicted will live beyond five years, depending upon demographic factors.

7.Residential pooling studies from both North America and Europe provide direct evidence linking residential radon exposure to lung cancer; “These findings effectively end any doubts about the risks to Americans of having radon in their homes,” said Tom Kelly, Director of EPA’s Indoor Environments Division. “The research confirms that breathing low levels of radon can lead to lung cancer.”

8.Because radon is a Class A carcinogen, and elevated be found in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Surgeon General recommend all homeowners and all homebuyers test for indoor radon

9.Elevated radon concentrations can be found in every community. Houses with basement, slab-on-grade and crawlspace construction all have the potential for dangerous radon levels.

10.In 2005, the U.S. Surgeon General issued a Health Advisory warning Americans about the health risk from exposure to radon in indoor air.

11.Radon-induced lung cancer can easily be prevented by testing your home and reducing concentrations that are at or above EPA’s 4 pCi/l Action Level

12.Homes with elevated radon concentration can easily be fixed with the installation of an Active Soil Depressurization System by a certified or state licensed radon mitigation contractor.

13.ASD systems also decrease moisture and other soil gases entering the home, reducing molds, mildews, methane, pesticide gases, volatile organic compounds and other indoor air quality problems.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Visit website