Could You Lose $27,000 on eBay? Authors Cast Light on Rampant Cases of Auction Fraud in New Book

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EBay has 100 million registered users and over 45 million active buyers and sellers. While many of these auctions take place without a hitch, most eBay users have no idea how easy it is to get ripped off.

EBay has 100 million registered users and over 45 million active buyers and sellers. While many of these auctions take place without a hitch, most eBay users have no idea how easy it is to get ripped off.

In 2003, Steve Klink, a New Jersey police officer, won an auction for a set of speakers that had been described as new. But he was outraged when the speakers arrived and he saw their condition. "They looked like they had been gnawed on by a wild animal," Klink says. The seller refused to exchange the items or refund his money and eBay said the bad deal wasn’t their responsibility.

As a result Klink started an eBay watchdog website and soon found he wasn't the only victim of auction scammers. Lurid stories of auction rip-offs and slick scams poured in from hapless victims: a woman whose wedding was ruined by moth-ridden tuxedoes, a collector duped out of $16,000 on a vintage Spiderman comic that was never mailed, a mysterious stalker who uses the eBay feedback system to blackmail victims, and the family-man trucker who lost a whopping $27,000 buying a rig that didn't exist. "EBay seems to dance around the ethics issues like a shoeless man in a rattlesnake pit,” lamented one victim after forking over $1,400 for a phony art vase. Klink's site grew in popularity and soon Klink found himself being interviewed everywhere from Court TV to newspapers as far away as South Africa.

Along with his brother Edward, a writer and editor, Klink wrote Dawn of the eBay Deadbeats to tell the stories of these victims. The book is a compilation of improbable scams and scary auction endings the authors say the mainstream media has been missing and eBay doesn't want users to know about.

In addition to exposing auction shenanigans the book offers tips to help honest eBayers avoid getting ripped off:

  •      Be wary if the person requests only one form of payment
  •     Read auctions carefully. Make sure you are bidding on exactly what you want. Some scams depend on a lengthy description that can be deceptive if not read thoroughly
  •     Never be put off for two weeks on a deal or you risk being unable to stop the credit card transaction
  •     Be wary if the person requests only one form of payment
  •     Don't use Western Union or MoneyGram when paying for auction purchases

Stephen Klink is a police officer and founder of ebayersthatsuck.com, the largest community of users dedicated to wiping out auction fraud. His brother and co-author, Edward Klink, is a business website editor and part-time adventure writer. Together, they spent over a year researching, compiling, and editing the outrageous stories that fill this book. In addition, many of the strange-but-true tales are punctuated with illustrations by the talented Clay Butler.

Dawn of the eBay Deadbeats ($12.95) is available on Amazon, eBay, through the authors' site, and in select bookstores.

Visit http://www.ebayersthatsuck.com

Source: Edward Klink and Stephen Klink

CONTACT: Edward Klink 201-739-3618 or edward@edwardklink.com

Web site: http://www.ebayersthatsuck.com
Web site: http://www.Mooncussermedia.com

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Klink brothers are available for interviews. Review copies available.

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