To Have Happy Guests, Casinos Must First Make Sure That Their Employees Are Also Enjoying Themselves; Motivated Employees Help Create Guest Advocates

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If casinos want their guests to have an enjoyable experience at their property, they should look inward to make that happen.

If casinos want their guests to have an enjoyable experience at their property, they should look inward to make that happen. They need to be sure their employees are enjoying themselves as well by rolling out an incentive program that rewards employees for providing outstanding customer service.

This, in turn, can make guests so pleased with their gaming experience that they become potential advocates for that casino.

“Guests are more likely to have fun if the casino’s employees also are having fun,” says Martin R. Baird, chief executive officer of Annapolis, Md.-based Robinson & Associates, Inc., a global customer service consulting firm for the gaming industry. “One way to have happy employees is to roll out an incentive and recognition program. Most people are thrilled when they are recognized and rewarded for doing a good job.”

Baird offers the following six tips on the importance of happy employees and how to show them their hard work is appreciated.

Number 1: If employees have a poor attitude or do not want to be at work, the casino’s guests will immediately know it. “Guests pick up on attitudes very quickly,” Baird says. “It’s not easy to enjoy yourself when those around you have a negative outlook. Guests will not go to a casino that isn’t fun.”

Number 2: Before starting an employee incentive and recognition program, determine what behaviors you’re look for from your staff. “Make this decision first so you know which behaviors to reward,” Baird suggests. “Smiling certainly projects a positive attitude. What else do you want to reward?”

Number 3: Assign an unbiased, third party to observe and decide whether employees are performing the way you want them to. “A third party has no stake in the outcome and that results in fair treatment of all employees,” Baird says. “If bias intrudes, your program will fail.”

Number 4: Decide what the rewards will be. Baird says studies show that a tangible gift is preferred over cash. “There are plenty of gift companies that can give you ideas,” Baird says. “Research them on the Internet. They have hundreds of gifts to choose from.”

Number 5: Give the reward as soon as possible after the desired behavior is observed. “Employees may not make the connection if the reward is presented three or four weeks after they did the right thing,” Baird notes. “Quick feedback reinforces the desired behavior.”

Number 6. Happy employees help create guest advocates – customers who, of their own free will, spread positive word-of-mouth advertising about a casino. “Outstanding service is critical to creating guest advocates and happy, motivated employees deliver superior service,” Baird says. “Employees also can become advocates who recommend their casino to potential guests.”

Robinson & Associates, Inc., is a global customer service consulting firm for the gaming industry. It helps casinos determine their Advocate Index, a number that indicates the extent to which properties have guests who are willing to be advocates. The company then implements its Advocate Development System in combination with the proven methodology of Advocate Index and best business practices to help casinos create more guest advocates and chart a course for growth and profitability. Robinson & Associates may be reached by phone at 480-991-6420, by e-mail at mbaird@casinocustomerservice.com or via its Web sites at http://www.advocateindex.com and http://www.casinocustomerservice.com. Robinson & Associates is a member of the Casino Management Association and an associate member of the National Indian Gaming Association.

Contact:

Martin R. Baird

Robinson & Associates, Inc.

http://www.casinocustomerservice.com
http://www.advocateindex.com
480-991-6420

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