Christian School Uses Competitive Robotics to Help Students Learn about Technology, Teamwork, and Life

Share Article

Seventh-Day Adventist Church teams plan to compete regionally in program endorsed by Carnegie Mellon Institute and American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Past News Releases

RSS

When veteran educator Joy Licht (“light”) first heard of “Lego Robotics” she figured it had to be some highly technical, agonizingly difficult project for true computer geeks with well-developed mechanical skills. “Then I tried it, found out that it was relatively easy, and -- most important -- it was fun,” smiles Mrs. Licht, a teacher at Augusta First Seventh-day Adventist School, 4301 Wheeler Road. “And, as a wonderful bonus, Robotics competition is an excellent educational tool with the additional benefit of helping kids learn teamwork, patience, and character skills.”

The local team will compete in the Adventist Robotics League Southern Union Regional competition to be held at Southern Adventist University in Collegedale, Tennessee in April. “Of course, we need sponsors for all three teams to make this dream a reality,” reports Joy Licht. “Each sponsorship -- which includes the sponsor’s logo on all team t-shirts, the cost of the Lego Robotics competition kits, and travel accommodations for the competitors -- is covered by an $1,800 donation.”

About The Adventist Robotics League

Robotics teaches children creative problem-solving and logic skills that are useful in many math and science fields. Furthermore, robotics is a great teaching tool that provides hands-on learning in physics, mechanics, computer programming, teamwork, and problem-solving while building teamwork skills.

The Adventist Robotics League promotes the use of robotics technology in the classroom. They encourage involvement by schools, home school groups, Pathfinder clubs (similar to scouting), and other organizations. (http://www.adventistroboticsleague.net)

The Adventist Robotics League is a FIRST Partner. FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is a multinational non-profit organization that aspires to transform culture, making science, math, engineering, and technology as cool for kids as sports are today. (http://www.usfirst.org)

About FIRST LEGO League

FLL is a result of an exciting alliance between FIRST and the LEGO Company. Guided by adult mentors and their own imaginations, FLL students solve real-world engineering challenges, develop important life skills, and learn to make positive contributions to society. (http://www.firstlegoleague.org)

For more information, call Joy Licht at (706) 651-0491.

Additional reference and resource links:

http://www.asme.org/ducation/precollege/partner.htm
http://www.rec.cmu.edu/education
http://www.lego.com/eng

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print