Indecent Play Sparks Protest at 21 Catholic Colleges

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Catholics have good reason to be concerned about the erosion of moral values at Catholic universities and colleges during the weeks surrounding Saint Valentine’s day. This is the time when students are afflicted by a play called “The V-Monologues,” scheduled to be staged at twenty-one Catholic campuses across the country.

Many Catholics have good reason to be concerned about the erosion of moral values at Catholic universities and colleges during the weeks surrounding Saint Valentine’s day. This is the time when students are afflicted by a play called “The V-Monologues,” scheduled to be staged at twenty-one Catholic campuses across the country.

Tradition Family Property Student Action is opposing the play again this year, urging its members on 716 campuses to protest. According to the TFP’s web site, the play is offensive: “In one scene, a woman describes her seduction by a lesbian woman when she was 16 years old, declaring it her ‘salvation’ and an important coming-of-age experience.”

“I cannot imagine why this immoral play would be shown anywhere, let alone at twenty-one Catholic universities,” said TFP Student Action director John Ritchie. “We are asking our affiliate members on 716 campuses, and all concerned Catholics, to protest by signing a personal online letter addressed to every university where the play is scheduled,” he said. “In less than twenty-four hours, 800 people have already signed our petition. Catholic universities should be morally correct, not politically correct. What our colleges need is modesty, not vulgarity.”

Together with the Cardinal Newman Society, TFP Student Action has protested “The V-Monologues” in the past with success. In 2003, thirty-two Catholic institutions planned to allow the play on campus. This year, only twenty-one Catholic universities appear willing to allow it.

Most Reverend John M. D'Arcy, bishop of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana, issued a public statement criticizing the play after it staged at the University of Notre Dame in 2004.

Last week, the president of Providence College, Rev. Brian J. Shanley, O.P., Ph.D., banned the play on his campus. “Doubtless some will reply that this is a violation of artistic freedom. But artistic freedom on a Catholic campus cannot mean the complete license to perform or display any work of art regardless of its intellectual or moral content,” said Fr. Shanley. “Any institution which sanctioned works of art that undermined its deepest values would be inauthentic, irresponsible, and ultimately self-destructive.”

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