Coaching Is Still More 'Talk,' Not Enough 'Results' Indicates BlessingWhite Study

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The latest workplace survey by global consulting firm BlessingWhite indicates that although 91% of leaders say they like or even love to coach, the majority of employees say the coaching they receive falls far short of making a significant impact on either their job performance or job satisfaction. In addition, nearly half say they don’t receive as much coaching as they want, while 16% actually get none.

The latest workplace survey by global consulting firm BlessingWhite indicates that although 91% of leaders say they like or even love to coach, the majority of employees say the coaching they receive falls far short of making a significant impact on either their job performance or job satisfaction. In addition, nearly half say they don’t receive as much coaching as they want, while 16% actually get none.

"This is the second year in a row where we have seen this disconnect,” explains Christopher Rice, BlessingWhite’s President and CEO. “Our findings suggest that most well-meaning leaders understand the value of coaching, but they are not coaching as often or effectively enough to drive increased employee engagement or better business results for their organizations.”

The report, called The Coaching Conundrum 2: the heart of coaching, provides insights into the challenges leaders face in coaching team members: “I don’t have all the answers” garnered 34%, followed by “It takes too long” at 26%. The report also identifies flaws in the approaches of organizations trying to establish a coaching culture. “Expectations are definitely increasing,” comments Rice. “Over three-quarters of the leaders said coaching was a priority in their organization. Yet less than two-thirds indicated that their organization backs up those expectations with a compensation or performance management initiative.”

The Coaching Conundrum 2 includes recommendations for business leaders on weaving core coaching beliefs and practices into the fabric of the organization. Rice notes, “Coaching is an important tool for aligning employees with business strategy, boosting performance, developing the leadership pipeline, engaging employees, and reducing turnover. Organizations need a comprehensive strategy to ensure their leaders’ coaching efforts deliver on this potential.”

About BlessingWhite

BlessingWhite is a global consulting firm dedicated to creating sustainable high-performance organizations. Based in Princeton, NJ, with locations in London, Chicago, San Francisco, and Melbourne, the company has worked with almost three million professionals in 1,300 organizations since its founding in 1973. BlessingWhite’s consulting services, tools, and training create high-performance cultures, develop leaders who get results and inspire, equip leaders to coach more strategically and efficiently, and align individual self-interest and talents at all levels of the organization with business-critical business goals.

About the Study

An online survey link was emailed in September 2005 to individuals representing a cross-section of job functions, job titles, and industries. All of the 677 respondents completed questions on the impact of coaching on them as employees. More than two-thirds of the group responded to additional questions about their activities as a coach. For a complete electronic copy of BlessingWhite’s 2006 Coaching Conundrum 2: the heart of coaching, contact Deb Ackles at Dackles@bwinc.com or call 908-904-1000 X8171.

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This press release was distributed through eMediawire by Human Resources Marketer (HR Marketer: http://www.HRmarketer.com) on behalf of the company listed above.

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Deb Ackles
BlessingWhite
908-904-1000 ext.817
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