Physical Activity Rising in Importance for Baby Boomers--New Research Report Identifies Interest in Physical Activity

Share Article

According to statistics compiled in the newly-released research report, "Active Aging in America, Residential and Commercial Fitness, United States 2005," boomers understand the value of physical activity and are seeking programs and facilities to find it.

There's the talk, and then there's the walk. At 77 million strong, the baby boomers can walk just about anywhere they please. It turns out they are walking to health clubs and wellness centers.

According to statistics compiled in the newly-released research report, "Active Aging in America, Residential and Commercial Fitness, United States 2005," boomers understand the value of physical activity and are seeking programs and facilities to find it.

Of adults 44 to 56 years interested in active adult communities, 88% said they would be happier in retirement if they remained physically active, according to a Del Web survey. This developer of retirement housing includes a well-equipped wellness center on its properties. Health club memberships for boomers ages 35 to 54 increased 13% between 1998 and 2004, and adults 55+ are the fastest growing membership segment in health clubs, says American Sport Data. And strength training is just behind walking and treadmills in popularity for the 55+, points out SGMA International research.

"Baby boomers are well aware of the value of physical activity and exercise," said Colin Milner, CEO of the International Council on Active Aging. They have grown up being educated on the health benefits of exercise and living in a culture that supports both women and men in physical activity."

Drawing upon multiple government, association and business research, Active Aging in America, Residential and Commercial Fitness explains why baby boomers don't exercise, even when they know they should, and provides demographic and psychographic data on their pursuit of time and opportunity for exercise.

"The baby boomers are aware that exercise is important, which makes it easier for architects, developers, seniors center management, fitness facilities and equipment designers. They don't have to sell boomers on the idea that exercise is good, they only need to provide the opportunities," commented Milner. "This report was developed so that the active aging industry can better understand their customers and their opportunities."

In addition to analysis and research reports for seniors housing (active adult, independent living and continuing care retirement communities), seniors centers and adult day care, fitness facilities, personal training and corporate wellness, the report contains a comprehensive list of demographic data on older adult growth rates, finances, health status and recreation and physical activity preferences. A Glossary makes understanding industry terminology easy, and the ICAA Functional levels and facility assessment guidelines are guideposts to what makes a business "age friendly."

For more information on ICAA membership and the Active Aging in America, Residential and Commercial Fitness, United States 2005 research report, visit the ICAA web site at http://www.icaa.cc or call 866-335-9777 or 604-734-4466.

About Active Aging

The concept of active aging can be summed up in the phrase "engaged in life." Active aging describes individuals who live life as fully as possible within the six dimensions of wellness (emotional, vocational, physical, spiritual, intellectual, social). Regardless of socioeconomic status or health conditions, individuals can participate in life as fully as possible.

Physical activity is an important wellness dimension that positively influences all of life's areas by improving physical function and mental skills, improving outlooks, offering social contact and better preparing us overall for work and home. While focusing on physical activity to encourage health and functional ability, ICAA also provides information on older adults' cognitive skills and mental health, work lives, intellectual pursuits, nutrition and social interactions.

About the International Council on Active Aging

http://www.icaa.cc

The ICAA is the world's largest membership association dedicated to changing the way we age by uniting and working with professionals in the retirement, assisted living, recreation, fitness, rehabilitation and wellness fields. We connect a community of like-minded professionals who share the goals of changing society's perceptions of aging and improving the quality of life for Baby Boomers and older adults within the six dimensions of wellness (emotional, vocational, physical, spiritual, intellectual, social).

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Colin Milner
ICAA
604--734-4466
Email >
Visit website